Becky Hammon and the Liberty Ring of Honor

When the WNBA began, I had season tickets at Madison Square Garden for the New York Liberty. And what I remember most about that team was the tiny blonde rookie guard who’d come off the bench and sink 3s from NBA distance.

And this week, the Liberty added that little guard, Becky Hammon, to its Ring of Honor:

Every Liberty fan from those days loved Becky. The franchise player was the center, Rebecca Lobo, who was on all of the billboards and in all of the WNBA promotion when the league started. But Becky was the player everyone rooted for. Here’s forward Sue Wicks talking about Becky’s early career:

And how good was she? Here you go:

But the future looks extremely interesting:

So the kid with bangs might be a head coach in the NBA? Had no idea that was going to happen.

 

The voices in your head

You know those voices you hear every day, but they’re not from people you’ve ever seen?

Like this one:

And this one:

In D.C., we hear these voices every day. And there are other voices like these throughout the world. On mass transportation throughout the country, in your GPS, on your particular phone.

When humans disappear and aliens visit the planet. They’re going to still have a lot of people talking to them and telling them whatever they want to know.

Here:

 

Riding light and sending sounds in space

The speed of light is 186,000 miles per second. That’s per second, not per hour. If you travel at the speed of light for an hour, you cover 671 million miles.

That’s fast, right?

Well maybe on Earth it is, but the universe is a big place. It took about five hours for the signal from the New Horizons probe to travel from Pluto to Earth. And that’s traveling at the speed of light.

To put it in perspective, take a look at this if you’ve got 45 minutes to spare:

That’s how long it would take to get from the Sun to Jupiter: 45 minutes.

Forty-five minutes of nothing but emptiness with a few big space rocks called planets, moons and asteroids showing up every few minutes to break up the monotony. I bore easily, so if it took this long to get to Jupiter, imagine how many “Are we there yet”s I’m going to ask on a trip to Pluto.

If we’re ever going to get to other parts of the galaxy, we’re going to have to break the light barrier. Which means we’re probably not going anywhere. Maybe a billion years from now, our robot satellites in space like Pioneer, Voyager and New Horizons will be picked up by some alien civilization, which will ask: What the hell is this?

This is the Golden Record we sent on Voyager back in 1977: a collection of greetings in different languages, sounds of life and selections of music, plus a roadmap to where we are. Voyager has left the solar system and is now in interstellar space.

So let’s say Voyager does end up on a planet in another part of the galaxy where there’s intelligent life. What do you think the aliens would say? Maybe this?

Check out the Speaking of Science blog at the Washington Post for more about the Golden Record.