About brobrubel

Retired journalist. I've reported and edited for newspaper in Florida, Kentucky, New York, Brussels and London. I also spent a few years as a government flack in Pennsylvania. This blog contains random thoughts on politics, world affairs and entertainment

What time is it?

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According to Google software engineer Stefano Maggiolo, the actual time based on the position of the Sun is usually nowhere near the actual time based on the edict of a government. Which makes sense. For example, China’s about 3,000 miles wide, but only has one time zone. Sun can’t be over the entire country in the same place at the same time, can it?

(Click to enlarge, and this map is HUGE!!!)

Your Republican frontrunners for the presidential nomination

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CPAC met a few miles south of me this past week, and the conservatives decided who they preferred as their presidential candidate. Honestly, I see at most two viable candidates, and neither one is anywhere near the lead.

Cue the circus music:

Yes, I’m being too harsh:

Phil Robertson, the man infamous for his role on the A&E reality series “Duck Dynasty” and for his controversial comments on gay sex, gave a speech on Friday at the Conservative Political Action Conference that was long, bizarre, and at times even a little incoherent.

As Robertson was introduced at CPAC, it was noted that he was the recipient of the 2015 Andrew Breitbart Defender of the First Amendment Award. He then used his First Amendment freedom to speak for nearly half an hour, touching on off-brand topics like sexually transmitted diseases, Nazis, communism, and Jesus.

Strike that, I’m not being harsh enough. The strange thing isn’t what he said. It’s that he got an award as a defender of free speech.

The Star Trek crew and the Enterprise via NASA

enterprise

Via Knowmore:

NASA posted the photo above on Friday, following news that Leonard Nimoy passed away in Los Angeles at age 83. The photo shows NASA officials and “Star Trek” cast members standing together in 1976 in front of NASA’s space shuttle Enterprise, named for show’s iconic spacecraft.

As Star Trek’s Vulcan science officer Mr. Spock, Nimoy was an inspiration for many at NASA. He often joined other cast members in at NASA special events and promoting NASA missions, as in the photo above.

From left to right are NASA Administrator James D. Fletcher; DeForest Kelley, who portrayed Dr. “Bones” McCoy on the series; George Takei (Mr. Sulu); James Doohan (Chief Engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott); Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura); Leonard Nimoy (Mr. Spock); series creator Gene Roddenberry; U.S. Rep. Don Fuqua (D.-Fla.); and, Walter Koenig (Ensign Pavel Chekov).

Captain Kirk was probably off cavorting with some space babe.

Leonard Nimoy: He lived long and he prospered

William Shatner, Deforest Kelley and Leonard Nimoy from the original "Star Trek." Nimoy died today.

William Shatner, Deforest Kelley and Leonard Nimoy from  “Star Trek.” Nimoy died today at 83.

One of the things I remember about Leonard Nimoy was that through the character Spock, he made intellectualism and logic seem cool. He’s been Spock forever (or for those who’ve lived long enough, since 1966) and in the course of Star Trek history, Spock has lived, died, been reborn and was the reason for a time line that last had him consulting with his younger self.

As Spock would say, “That is illogical,” but we accepted it because in science fiction, no one ever dies.

Spock joins Bones and Scotty in the reality afterlife (Deforest Kelley died in 1999. James Doohan died in 2005.) But they live forever in our television and film libraries.

(I won’t get into the “In Search of …” series, or his role as Paris in “Mission Impossible.”)

Let’s end this with a “Spock off”: