Republicans and Thanksgiving turkeys


This involves the great turkey pardon of 2014. At this point, I can only shake my head in disgust:

The examples of the GOP’s reflexive opposition to President Obama’s agenda are many but this may be the best one yet: By a 27 point margin, Republicans say they disapprove of the President’s executive order last year pardoning two Thanksgiving turkeys (Macaroni and Cheese) instead of the customary one. Only 11% of Republicans support the President’s executive order last year to 38% who are opposed — that’s a pretty clear sign that if you put Obama’s name on something GOP voters are going to oppose it pretty much no matter what. Overall there’s 35/22 support for the pardon of Macaroni and Cheese thanks to 59/11 support from Democrats and 28/21 from independents.

Yeah, I know you don’t believe this. But check out the data at Public Policy Polling. Here’s the link.

And here’s a photo of one of the lucky turkeys, Cheese:


According to the Allentown Morning Call last year:

Mac is a “feather shaker” who weighs in at 47 pounds and boasts a melodious gobble that has a hint of bluegrass, #TeamMac supporters within the White House confirmed.

Cheese is a “grand champion” who weights in at 49 pounds and has a gobble that manages to be both romantic and has a country ring, #TeamCheese White House aides said.

The 2015 White House turkey pardon is tomorrow. One turkey, named Tom One, from California has already been chosen to be spared the roaster. If I were Obama, I’d pardon three this year, just to piss the turkeys (the GOP, not the fowl) off even more.

Our Thanksgiving paradox

An interesting opening sentence involving Thanksgiving that my son referred me to on the website Five Thirty Eight:

Thanksgiving — when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores — is once again upon us.

Very appropriate, but my problem is that I thought too much about it. Because the reality is, it would have been better for the natives if they had kept the refugees out.


An overstatement? Not really. Here’s a video on display at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian involving what the first European immigrants did to the people who had lived here for centuries.

Just to clarify, this is not an anti-immigrant post.

It’s just an observation that there is absolutely nothing today’s immigrants can do that’s worse than what the original immigrants to this country have already done.


The art world has gone to the dogs


This painting sold for $658,000 at Sotheby’s. I don’t know what to say. Here’s some history from the Sotheby’s catalog:

Cassius Marcellus Coolidge (1844-1934), began painting the daily life of some very humanoid canines, an artistic subspecialty that was preceded by a string of careers. In the upstate New York town of Antwerp, Coolidge worked, almost simultaneously, as a druggist, painter of street signs and house numbers, and founder of the first newspaper and earliest bank all within the years between 1868 and 1872. It was after a trip to Europe in 1873 that he turned up in Rochester, New York, as the portraitist of dogs whose life-style mirrored the successful middle-class humans of his time. Coolidge’s first customers were cigar companies, who printed copies of his paintings for giveaways. His fortunes rose when he signed a contract with the printers Brown & Bigelow, who turned out hundreds of thousands of copies of his dog-genre subjects as advertising posters, calendars, and prints.

“Coolidge’s poker-faced style is still engaging today. His dogs fit with amazing ease into such human male phenomena as the all-night card game, the commuter train, and the ball park. His details of expression, clothing, and furniture are precise. Uncannily, the earnest animals resemble people we all know, causing distinctions of race, breed, and color to vanish and evoking the sentiment on an old Maryland gravestone: MAJOR Born a Dog Died a Gentleman” (“A Man’s Life,” American Heritage, February 1973, p. 56).

Don’t know who bought it. I guess it’s the kind of a barometer of taste that you don’t want people to know about if you’re a rich person. Or maybe the rich person just bought it for his dog?

Because there obviously wasn’t anything better the person could do with the money.

Our message to the universe

This golden record will likely never be found. But let’s say that billions of years from now some Jedi master comes across it in a galaxy far, far away. Is this going to make any sense? If an alien civilization is technologically advances enough to pick it up in space, yes, it should make sense. And if it decides that the Earth is ripe for conquest, fine. It’s not going to be the Earth displayed on this disc.

Because the disc doesn’t show how dangerous we can be. All the alien sees is a lot of little kids, and a lot of people eating. Really, what kind of fight are they going to put up. In the next mission, send out a copy of the movie “Independence Day,” even with all its flaws. That will take Earth off the alien visitation list.

Don’t want to live like a refugee


There’s an idiot in Roanoke, Va., who says all Syrian refugees should be rounded up and placed in internment camps, like the United States did in World War II with the Japanese.

Apparently he thinks that was a good thing. And he’s the mayor and a Democrat.

And of course, we have this:


Stupid is contagious. Because we’ve had refugee problems throughout history, and our record has been less than admirable. Years ago, there was an ethnic group trying to get to the United States to get away from rampaging murderous bastards. And this is how we responded:


The results of the poll illustrated above by the useful Twitter account @HistOpinion were published in the pages of Fortune magazine in July 1938. Fewer than 5 percent of Americans surveyed at the time believed that the United States should raise its immigration quotas or encourage political refugees fleeing fascist states in Europe — the vast majority of whom were Jewish — to voyage across the Atlantic. Two-thirds of the respondents agreed with the proposition that “we should try to keep them out.”