Kentucky Maps That Make the Rude Pundit Want to Drink Moonshine Until He’s Blind

I’m still trying to figure out how poor people in bad health in Kentucky decided they wanted a Republican governor who promised to take away their health insurance.

The Rude Pundit explained it to me:

So people who have less than nothing would rather have their cancer go untreated than take Medicaid from a Negro or allow two people of the same sex to get married. That is about as delusional and pathetic as it gets and, frankly, so gut-level, depressingly dumb that, on his crueler days, the Rude Pundit thinks it’d be just fine for them all to get sick and die and raise the intelligence of the species just a bit. Hell, they pretty much just admitted that they’re cool with that.

But here’s the thing: The country will not move forward without an appeal to the gut-level stupid. Forget the fucked-in-the-brain-by-religion crowd. They’re out of reach. But there is a contingent of the rural poor that can be reached and can be brought into the fold. It’s just been too long without any real effort to do so, not during the Reagan or Bush or Clinton or Bush II years and not as much as needed during the Obama administration.

Sure, it’d be easy to say, “Well, let ’em freeze to death in a ditch with their single tooth.” Except for shit like this very election, shit that keeps happening, that happened in 2014, too, shit that has an effect on the House of Representatives, for instance. That has to do with the lives of you and, more importantly, the Rude Pundit.

The stupid people aren’t going away. We just haven’t figured out how to make them less stupid.

Here’s a map of the election results. Typical blue and red designations:

ky election

And here’s a map of where Medicaid is used the most in the state. The more brown, the more Medicaid:

ky medicaid

So most of the places that rely on Medicaid thought it was a good idea to vote for the guy who said he would get rid of the healthcare they rely on. That means they are more likely to die. That’s what getting rid of the state exchange means.

And they knew that’s what he was going to do. I voted in the Kentucky election and I saw the ads. It wasn’t something Matt Blevin, the Republican governor-elect, was trying to sneak through.

So what’s drove them to vote for that? The Washington Post took a look at that today:

Dennis Blackburn has this splintered self-interest. The 56-year-old mechanic hasn’t worked in 18 months, since he lost his job at a tire company that supplies a diminishing number of local coal mines. “The old guy had to go home,” Blackburn says of his layoff.

He has a hereditary liver disorder, numbness in his hands and legs, back pain from folding his 6-foot-1-inch frame into 29-inch mine shafts as a young man, plus an abnormal heart rhythm — the likely vestige of having been struck by lightning 15 years ago in his tin-roofed farmhouse.

Blackburn was making small payments on an MRI he’d gotten at Pikeville Medical Center, the only hospital in a 150-mile radius, when he heard about Big Sandy’s Shelby Valley Clinic. There he met Fleming, who helped him sign up for one of the managed-care Medicaid plans available in Kentucky.

On Election Day, Blackburn voted for Bevin because he is tired of career politicians and thought a businessman would be more apt to create the jobs that Pike County so needs. Yet when it comes to the state’s expansion of health insurance, “it doesn’t look to me as if he understands,” Blackburn said. “Without this little bit of help these people are giving me, I could probably die. . . . It’s not right to not understand something but want to stamp it out.”

I don’t know what to say. The guy just signed his own death warrant. He doesn’t realize that Blevin fully understands what he’s doing. This isn’t a case of a politician being misguided, because he absolutely believes the poor are moochers and are better off dead.

Maybe it’s for the best. Sometimes, you’ve got to thin out the herd.

Matt Blevin Source: Kentucky Maps That Make the Rude Pundit Want to Drink Moonshine Until He’s Blind

Free market pharmacy


In case you don’t know the name, Martin Shkreli, the CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, is the douchebag who raised the price of a life-saving drug from $13.50 to $750.

Seeing the wrong of his ways, he did what any capitalist with a conscience would do:

The former hedge funder who garnered widespread criticism for raising a 62-year-old drug’s price by more than 5,000% has hired a lobbying firm.

Turing Pharmaceuticals recently hired four lobbyists from Buchanan Ingersoll and Rooney, according to disclosure forms filed with the US House of Representatives and US Senate Tuesday.

The lobbying giant filed the disclosure, writing that the purpose was “strategy development and implementation of the company’s federal government relations initiatives.”

Thus cementing his status as a scumbag you most definitely want to punch in the face.

The average price of marijuana in each state


OK, let’s look at this from a purely economic standpoint. It’s common knowledge that some of the highest quality pot is grown in Kentucky. Let’s say the legislators in Frankfort decide one day that marijuana should be legal. Based on where it’s already legal, the price will drop significantly.

Now look at the surrounding states. Do you see how much easy revenue can be generated as buyers crass state lines to take advantage of the weed next door?

Kentucky is a poor state. The jobs it’s trying to keep are fading away fast. The coal industry is dying and the fact that Kentucky’s congressional delegation is still pushing it is a waste of time.

Pot is all over the place. It’s renewable. And no matter what laws are passed, people are still going to spend billions of dollars to get stoned.

And society is not going to collapse with legalization.

Take advantage of the market. Use the tax revenue to rebuild infrastructure that will bring real jobs to the state. And set aside a reasonable percentage to pay for substance abuse programs. This isn’t wild speculation. It could actually work.

A look at the health of America

A couple of different maps here. The first shows the states where people take the most prescription drugs: the-bible-belt-americas-most-medicated-region-1423059291.23-2313524 And the second shows the most distinctive cause of death in each state. imrs People don’t look too healthy in Kentucky, where there’s an overabundance of people on pills and the main cause of death seems to show people can’t breathe. But in the last U.S. Senate election the winner vowed to get rid of Obamacare and to do more to promote the use of coal. This is a prime example of people voting against their own interests. But I’m really shocked by Louisiana. How can people possibly die of syphilis in the 21st century? That’s treatable. Meanwhile, Arizona, Arkansas, Tennessee and Alabama really should reconsider their love of guns. Because guns don’t kill people. People with guns kill people.

From KnowMore:

The map doesn’t show the most common cause of death — that is generally heart disease or cancer. Instead, it shows the cause of death in each state that stands out the most relative to its national average

Where the nitrogen wind goes sweeping down the plains

This is going to end badly.

On Friday, Oklahoma governor Mary Fallin signed a bill that allows the state to execute inmates using nitrogen gas in the event that traditional lethal injection drugs are unavailable. The use of nitrogen gas, which induces hypoxia, has never been tested on humans, but supporters maintain that the method is both humane and painless.

Let’s try a method of execution that’s never been tested before. I mean, what could go wrong?

There is something called nitrogen narcosis, which affects scuba divers and involves pressurized the pressurized inert gas.

1. Emotional Effects of Narcosis on Divers:

Depending upon the diver and the dive environment, narcosis may cause a diver to feel either positive, euphoric emotions or negative, stressful emotions. Both scenarios are dangerous.

A diver feeling overly relaxed and happy may fail to react appropriately to a dangerous situation because he feels that everything is fine. An example is a euphoric diver who notices that he has exceeded his tank reserve pressure, but decides to continue diving because he feels great and therefore isn’t worried about running out of air.

A diver who experiences feelings of dread or stress may perceive problems which do not exist or may react inappropriately to those that do. An example is a stressed diver who notices that he has reached his tank reserve pressure. He panics, inflates his buoyancy compensator, and rockets to the surface because he is afraid that he will run out of air if he makes a normal controlled descent, even though he has more than sufficient air to do so.

2. Narcosis Slows and Impairs Mental Abilities:

Narcosis affects a diver’s ability to reason, evaluate situations, decide on appropriate courses of action, and recall information. Narcosis also slows a diver’s thinking and reaction times. In effect, a diver experiencing narcosis thinks less clearly and more slowly than he normally does.

Foggy thinking and reasoning underwater is dangerous. Even normal situations can lead to potential disasters as a diver’s mental abilities decline. As an example, a diver who is negatively buoyant may fail to inflate his buoyancy compensator because he doesn’t recognize the problem (failing to evaluate the situation). Or, he may try to compensate for negative buoyancy by kicking himself up (failing to decide on an appropriate course of action).

I have no idea what happens when a person is confined to a room that’s only supplying nitrogen, but since this has never been tested on humans as a form of execution, it seems the possibilities are that:

1) Witnesses to the execution will watch a guy laughing his ass off before he collapses and dies, or …

2) Witnesses to the execution will watch a guy screaming his head off before he collapses and dies.

I think I would have nightmares forever if I ever saw that. Oklahoma is not OK.