What do progressives believe?

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) appeared at Netroots Nation Friday and explained it all to you.

Most true Americans believe these things, not the stuff that the Tea Party terrorists stand for, and …

Wait?! Wasn’t that the Incredible Hulk at the end? If we’re gonna fight, and Hulk smash, we will win.

Millennials aren’t leaving the nest

There seems to be a debate on whether more young adults are remaining at home instead of heading out into the cold, cruel world. Hence, the need for a chart:

Shareof1824LivingWithParents

Of course, all trends are theories until you know someone who is personally affected. So let’s take a look, shall we?

I’m at home. I have a son. He’s 23. He is currently upstairs in his room.

Trend confirmed!

According to Vox:

The best evidence, in other words, is that the conventional wisdom is correct. Due to high unemployment and sluggish wage growth, lots of young people who aren’t in school don’t have very much money in their pockets. And yet even though young people have less money today, rents are higher and mortgage lending standards are tighter. Higher costs plus lower incomes = growing need to economize, so more people are living with their parents.

Not to mention, our old Kentucky home is so big, it makes sense for our son to be here, since the space he occupies is the equivalent of a studio apartment with its own kitchen and bathroom. I know this because my studio apartment in D.C. is smaller.

The World Cup is depraved and decadent

Or more specifically, its governing body, FIFA, is, according to John Oliver:

That is impressive. Make a country change its laws against drinking. Create your own court that can send people away to jail for 15 years. Put an outdoor game in a country where the temperature is 122 degrees.

Can you imagine an American sports organization pulling something like that?

New details have emerged about the deal bringing the Super Bowl to Minneapolis.

Some of the conditions include: hotel accommodations, free police escorts and free advertising. They’re on the long list of requests in a confidential 153-page document obtained by the Star Tribune.

The National Football League made the specifications before it named Minneapolis the host city for the 2018 Super Bowl. Dated November 2013, the document details everything from field preps, to reserving bowling venues for the Super Bowl Celebrity Bowling Classic.

Nice try NFL. You’re in the Pee Wee League compared to FIFA’s professional corruption status.

Property damage costs in Godzilla (1998)

I haven’t had chance to see the new “Godzilla” with Bryan Cranston, but I did see the one with Matthew Broderick where the big lizard (is that what Godzilla is) wrecked New York City.

How much do you think it would cost to fix New York after that one?

A substantial figure. But I suspect the new “Godzilla” is going to top that number.

Wealth distribution (or lack thereof)

I’ve been reading Elizabeth Warren’s new book “A Fighting Chance,” and I’m about to start Thomas Piketty’s “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” so I’m getting a short course on the American financial system and income and wealth inequality.

Ezra Kline at Vox had a pretty good explainer on why income inequality isn’t as serious a problem as wealth inequality:

Then I remembered that back at the beginning of the year, the folks at Bloomberg News pointed out the latest developments in income inequality:

Even those with college degrees are having trouble keeping up …. While they earn more than those with less schooling, they’ve seen no real wage growth in recent years. The median income of men 25 years of age and older with a bachelor’s degree was $56,656 last year, 10 percent less than in 2007 after taking account of inflation, according to Census data.

“It’s very difficult for anyone middle-income and lower,” said Ryan Sekac, 26, a mechanical engineer in Westerly, Rhode Island. “There was a time when it was easier.”

It hard for people in the middle income and lower. But for the wealthy?

In the meantime, record-high stock prices are enriching wealthier Americans, exacerbating polarization and bringing income inequality to the political forefront. Even independent government agencies like the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Reserve have been dragged into the debate. …

The richest 10 percent of Americans earned a larger share of income last year than at any time since 1917, according to Emmanuel Saez, an economist at the University of California at Berkeley. Those in the top one-tenth of income distribution made at least $146,000 in 2012, almost 12 times what those in the bottom tenth made, Census Bureau data show.

And just one more thing for people who are middle class and anti-union to get into their thick skulls:

The decline of unions — 11.3 percent of workers were represented in 2012 compared with 20.1 percent in 1983 — has advantaged bosses at the expense of their employees.

I should have studied economics back in college when I had the chance. There’s so much catching up to do.

Divide and conquer: The GOP solution to the poor

North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis in action:

Do you really need a translation? When a Republican says:

And we need to get those folks to look down at these people who choose to get into a condition that makes them dependent on the government and say at some point, “You’re on your own. We may end up taking care of those babies, but we’re not going to take care of you.” And we’ve got to start having that serious discussion.”

These people means “those people” because for a GOP crowd it’s always a matter of Us vs. Them. And for a Republican, who might “them” be?

Let’s stop pretending we don’t know when Republicans are speaking in code. Tillis gets away with what he’s saying because he knows how to use the code words. Listen to the message: Thom Tillis is saying EXACTLY THE SAME THING Cliven Bundy is saying. The difference? Bundy was just using the language of the past, when you could run as a politician in the South against the “nigra”.

Time to quote the godfather of racial code Lee Atwater:

You start out in 1954 by saying, “Nigger, nigger, nigger.” By 1968 you can’t say “nigger”—that hurts you, backfires. So you say stuff like, uh, forced busing, states’ rights, and all that stuff, and you’re getting so abstract. Now, you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is, blacks get hurt worse than whites.… “We want to cut this,” is much more abstract than even the busing thing, uh, and a hell of a lot more abstract than “Nigger, nigger.”

For anyone running against the GOP, it isn’t a matter of divide and conquer. There’s no difference between the sophisticates and the troglodytes in that party. The focus has to be conquer.