A look at the health of America

A couple of different maps here. The first shows the states where people take the most prescription drugs: the-bible-belt-americas-most-medicated-region-1423059291.23-2313524 And the second shows the most distinctive cause of death in each state. imrs People don’t look too healthy in Kentucky, where there’s an overabundance of people on pills and the main cause of death seems to show people can’t breathe. But in the last U.S. Senate election the winner vowed to get rid of Obamacare and to do more to promote the use of coal. This is a prime example of people voting against their own interests. But I’m really shocked by Louisiana. How can people possibly die of syphilis in the 21st century? That’s treatable. Meanwhile, Arizona, Arkansas, Tennessee and Alabama really should reconsider their love of guns. Because guns don’t kill people. People with guns kill people.

From KnowMore:

The map doesn’t show the most common cause of death — that is generally heart disease or cancer. Instead, it shows the cause of death in each state that stands out the most relative to its national average

The real story behind the Yellowstone bear incident

So a bunch of tourist were at Yellowstone National Park when a family of bears attacked. At least that’s the frenzied media reaction I saw this week. But here’s what really happened (from National Geographic):

It started with what’s called a “bear jam,” the park’s term for when visitors stop their cars to gawk at a bear—in this case, a family of bears grazing on a hillside near a bridge.

Suddenly the bears, including a mom and her yearling cubs, took a wrong turn and ended up on the bridge along with the curious human onlookers. Their instinct was to get away from the people as quickly as possible, but the people got frightened and blocked her, says Kerry Gunther, head of bear management at Yellowstone.

“It’s obvious she gets a little nervous as she’s trying to get across the bridge,” says Gunther, who was not present but watched the video and spoke to a park colleague who observed the incident.

“The bear was not after people—it could have easily caught anyone it wanted,” he says, adding that the video shows the bears trying to get around the people, but being thwarted because the humans kept moving.

“Pretty much all the events [in the video] were influenced by human behavior.”

So the bears are minding their own business when a bunch of dopes hop out of their cars to take photos. The bears get scared and try to run away, but the people, instead of clearing a path, block the bears. And you see in the video, there are still a bunch of dopes taking photos.

When I saw the video this week, my first though was: “Those bears are moving kind of slow, aren’t they?” Because bears can outrun humans … and definitely these humans.

That’s the punchline about the two guys in a forest who see a bear coming their way and one says, “I don’t have to outrun the bear. I just have to outrun you.”

Tourists and wildlife don’t mix. It causes too much distress for the wildlife.