Temple Grandin’s Ted Talk

Temple Grandin is autistic. She’s also one of the important minds in cattle research and management.

There was an HBO movie about her starring Claire Danes, which was pretty good. It gave a very clear explanation of the life of an autistic person.

The thing I find interesting in this Ted Talk is that I get the feeling when she says things that people laugh at, she isn’t intentionally telling a joke. She’s just relaying information, knows that people are laughing, but doesn’t comprehend why they think its funny.

But that doesn’t stop her, because she has a point to make.

 

High heel horrors

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I don’t understand high heels, but I’m a guy. It just looks like the wearer is always going to fall forward. If there’s an emergency, you can’t run in them. A co-worker once told me she liked the way her legs looked. But if you have good looking legs, you can go barefoot and no one would be disappointed.

But maybe I’m just overstating this?

Your killer heels are killing much more than you think. One in 10 women wear high heels at least three days a week and a third have fallen while wearing them. Statistics show that high heels are one of the biggest factors leading to foot problems in women, with up to a third suffering permanent problems as a result of prolonged wear. …

The increased weight on your toes causes your body to tilt forward, and to compensate, you lean backwards and overarch your back, creating a posture that can strain your knees, hips, and lower back.  …

Over time, wearing high heels can shorten the muscles in your calves and in your back, leading to pain and muscle spasms. … many women who wear high heels often suffer a shortening of the Achilles tendon because once the heel is pointed upwards, it tightens up. Stretching it again or switching to flats can be very painful; it can even lead to plantar fasciitis.

So that’s the bad side of it. Remember that chart a while back about where the heels are the highest in the U.S.?tumblr_ne8anqJJ471qgexq2o1_r2_1280

 

Seems like there’s a lot of pain in Puerto Rico.

 

Hope and change 2015

Remember back in 2008, when Barack Obama won the presidency because he ran on a platform of hope and change? And remember how pissed of his supporters were after a few years because change didn’t happen immediately.

But today:

The Supreme Court on Friday delivered a historic victory for gay rights, ruling 5 to 4 that the Constitution requires that same-sex couples be allowed to marry no matter where they live and that states may no longer reserve the right only for heterosexual couples.

And yesterday:

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a key part of the Affordable Care Act that provides health insurance subsidies to all qualifying Americans, awarding a major victory to President Obama and validating his most prized domestic achievement.

And this week:

After decades of bitter debate over whether the Confederate battle flag is a proud symbol of regional heritage or a shameful emblem of this nation’s most grievous sins, the argument may finally be moving toward an end.

South Carolina is leading the way for other states, as it considers removing the flag from its capitol grounds in the wake of a horrific racial hate crime.

Since Obama has taken office, we’ve extricated ourselves from two wars promoted by the previous president. The legalization of marijuana is taking place throughout the country and people are really getting pissed off that law enforcement tends to be more severe with certain races and ethnic groups than others.

This is fundamental change, and for some people, this is the most significant change they’ve seen in their lifetimes. But we see that change isn’t immediate. It takes a lot of hard work, and it faces virulent opposition. But it does happen. And once it does, it’s our responsibility as citizens to realize that just because we win one round, we then don’t just pack up our posters and say, “Well, I’m done. I got mine.”

We are making advances every day. This week, the liberals win. Don’t think the conservatives won’t counter with even more rabid condemnations of the Black-Marxist-Nazi-Kenyan usurper.

We are approaching a presidential election year. The battle lines are drawn. How far to the right will the Republicans go? Because the Democrats don’t have to move an inch.

The average price of marijuana in each state

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OK, let’s look at this from a purely economic standpoint. It’s common knowledge that some of the highest quality pot is grown in Kentucky. Let’s say the legislators in Frankfort decide one day that marijuana should be legal. Based on where it’s already legal, the price will drop significantly.

Now look at the surrounding states. Do you see how much easy revenue can be generated as buyers crass state lines to take advantage of the weed next door?

Kentucky is a poor state. The jobs it’s trying to keep are fading away fast. The coal industry is dying and the fact that Kentucky’s congressional delegation is still pushing it is a waste of time.

Pot is all over the place. It’s renewable. And no matter what laws are passed, people are still going to spend billions of dollars to get stoned.

And society is not going to collapse with legalization.

Take advantage of the market. Use the tax revenue to rebuild infrastructure that will bring real jobs to the state. And set aside a reasonable percentage to pay for substance abuse programs. This isn’t wild speculation. It could actually work.

Our family values story for the day

From the Chattanooga Times Free Press:

The Tennessee Republican congressman who supported his ex-wife’s decision to get two abortions was among those who voted in favor of a ban on most late-term abortions.

Republican U.S. Rep. Scott DesJarlais, a Jasper physician, was one of 242 House members who voted Wednesday to pass the bill, which forbids most abortions starting with the 20th week of pregnancy.

“Congressman DesJarlais was proud to vote in favor of this legislation,” said his spokesman Robert Jameson, who added that DesJarlais has maintained a “100 percent pro-life voting record” during his five years in Congress and “has always advocated for pro-life values.”

DesJarlais’ support of his ex-wife’s abortions, which occurred before their 1995 marriage, was revealed after his 2012 re-election to Congress in a divorce trial transcript. The transcript also showed the physician had engaged in multiple affairs with patients, and pressured one of them to get an abortion after she told him she was pregnant. The outcome of that pregnancy is unknown.

People complain about government malfunction in Washington, but they keep electing hypocrites like this. The problem isn’t in Washington, it’s with the voters sending these kinds of people to Washington.

 

A look at the health of America

A couple of different maps here. The first shows the states where people take the most prescription drugs: the-bible-belt-americas-most-medicated-region-1423059291.23-2313524 And the second shows the most distinctive cause of death in each state. imrs People don’t look too healthy in Kentucky, where there’s an overabundance of people on pills and the main cause of death seems to show people can’t breathe. But in the last U.S. Senate election the winner vowed to get rid of Obamacare and to do more to promote the use of coal. This is a prime example of people voting against their own interests. But I’m really shocked by Louisiana. How can people possibly die of syphilis in the 21st century? That’s treatable. Meanwhile, Arizona, Arkansas, Tennessee and Alabama really should reconsider their love of guns. Because guns don’t kill people. People with guns kill people.

From KnowMore:

The map doesn’t show the most common cause of death — that is generally heart disease or cancer. Instead, it shows the cause of death in each state that stands out the most relative to its national average