Free market pharmacy


In case you don’t know the name, Martin Shkreli, the CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, is the douchebag who raised the price of a life-saving drug from $13.50 to $750.

Seeing the wrong of his ways, he did what any capitalist with a conscience would do:

The former hedge funder who garnered widespread criticism for raising a 62-year-old drug’s price by more than 5,000% has hired a lobbying firm.

Turing Pharmaceuticals recently hired four lobbyists from Buchanan Ingersoll and Rooney, according to disclosure forms filed with the US House of Representatives and US Senate Tuesday.

The lobbying giant filed the disclosure, writing that the purpose was “strategy development and implementation of the company’s federal government relations initiatives.”

Thus cementing his status as a scumbag you most definitely want to punch in the face.

Donald Trump isn’t the only Republican alienating women voters

Any reason why this is an issue for the GOP?



Anyway the Republican presidential candidates can stick their foot in their mouths even more on this issue?

Marco Rubio has defended his record as an opponent of abortion, against criticism arising from his statement during the first Republican presidential debate on Thursday that he had never advocated for exceptions of any kind, even if a woman’s life was in danger or when she had been raped.

Anyone else?

Wisconsin governor Scott Walker said he is prepared to sign into law a 20-week abortion ban without any exceptions for victims of rape or incest, arguing that women are concerned with those issues “in the initial months” of pregnancy.

Walker, a Republican who is expected to run for president in 2016, made the comments ahead of a public hearing in the Wisconsin legislature on proposed legislation that would outlaw abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Local television station WKOW aired Walker’s claim that an exception for rape or incest is not necessarily needed in the bill.

“I mean, I think for most people who are concerned about that, it’s in the initial months where they’re most concerned about it,” Walker said. “In this case, again, it’s an unborn life, it’s an unborn child, and that’s why we feel strongly about it. I’m prepared to sign it either way that they send it to us.”

Are we done yet?

“Ethel Waters, for example, was the result of a forcible rape,” [Mike] Huckabee said of the late American gospel singer. One-time presidential candidate Huckabee added: “I used to work for James Robison back in the 1970s, he leads a large Christian organization. He, himself, was the result of a forcible rape. And so I know it happens, and yet even from those horrible, horrible tragedies of rape, which are inexcusable and indefensible, life has come and sometimes, you know, those people are able to do extraordinary things.”

That’s all, right?

With Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in the mix, it’ll be a race to the bottom on women’s rights. But to a degree, Cruz’s campaign is a continuation of what Todd Akin started in 2012. (Akin was the Missouri Senate candidate who infamously remarked that victims of “legitimate rape” have ways to “shut that whole thing down” so they don’t get pregnant.) What was once an outlier on women’s right to choose an abortion – that even victims of rape and incest don’t have the right to terminate a pregnancy resulting from it – has now become a cornerstone of the Republican platform. And Republicans are now conflating abortion and birth control in an attempt to prevent women from accessing both.

Cruz, like Akin, opposes abortion for victims of rape and incest. He also labels forms of contraception such as Plan B “abortifacients”, which isn’t scientifically or medically correct. At the Value Voters Summitlast fall, Cruz repeatedly referred to contraception as “abortion-inducing drugs.”

So why are Republicans worried about Donald Trump alienating women voters? It hasn’t hurt him with the party’s voters. Just look at this poll taken after last week’s debate:


Temple Grandin’s Ted Talk

Temple Grandin is autistic. She’s also one of the important minds in cattle research and management.

There was an HBO movie about her starring Claire Danes, which was pretty good. It gave a very clear explanation of the life of an autistic person.

The thing I find interesting in this Ted Talk is that I get the feeling when she says things that people laugh at, she isn’t intentionally telling a joke. She’s just relaying information, knows that people are laughing, but doesn’t comprehend why they think its funny.

But that doesn’t stop her, because she has a point to make.


High heel horrors


I don’t understand high heels, but I’m a guy. It just looks like the wearer is always going to fall forward. If there’s an emergency, you can’t run in them. A co-worker once told me she liked the way her legs looked. But if you have good looking legs, you can go barefoot and no one would be disappointed.

But maybe I’m just overstating this?

Your killer heels are killing much more than you think. One in 10 women wear high heels at least three days a week and a third have fallen while wearing them. Statistics show that high heels are one of the biggest factors leading to foot problems in women, with up to a third suffering permanent problems as a result of prolonged wear. …

The increased weight on your toes causes your body to tilt forward, and to compensate, you lean backwards and overarch your back, creating a posture that can strain your knees, hips, and lower back.  …

Over time, wearing high heels can shorten the muscles in your calves and in your back, leading to pain and muscle spasms. … many women who wear high heels often suffer a shortening of the Achilles tendon because once the heel is pointed upwards, it tightens up. Stretching it again or switching to flats can be very painful; it can even lead to plantar fasciitis.

So that’s the bad side of it. Remember that chart a while back about where the heels are the highest in the U.S.?tumblr_ne8anqJJ471qgexq2o1_r2_1280


Seems like there’s a lot of pain in Puerto Rico.


Hope and change 2015

Remember back in 2008, when Barack Obama won the presidency because he ran on a platform of hope and change? And remember how pissed of his supporters were after a few years because change didn’t happen immediately.

But today:

The Supreme Court on Friday delivered a historic victory for gay rights, ruling 5 to 4 that the Constitution requires that same-sex couples be allowed to marry no matter where they live and that states may no longer reserve the right only for heterosexual couples.

And yesterday:

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a key part of the Affordable Care Act that provides health insurance subsidies to all qualifying Americans, awarding a major victory to President Obama and validating his most prized domestic achievement.

And this week:

After decades of bitter debate over whether the Confederate battle flag is a proud symbol of regional heritage or a shameful emblem of this nation’s most grievous sins, the argument may finally be moving toward an end.

South Carolina is leading the way for other states, as it considers removing the flag from its capitol grounds in the wake of a horrific racial hate crime.

Since Obama has taken office, we’ve extricated ourselves from two wars promoted by the previous president. The legalization of marijuana is taking place throughout the country and people are really getting pissed off that law enforcement tends to be more severe with certain races and ethnic groups than others.

This is fundamental change, and for some people, this is the most significant change they’ve seen in their lifetimes. But we see that change isn’t immediate. It takes a lot of hard work, and it faces virulent opposition. But it does happen. And once it does, it’s our responsibility as citizens to realize that just because we win one round, we then don’t just pack up our posters and say, “Well, I’m done. I got mine.”

We are making advances every day. This week, the liberals win. Don’t think the conservatives won’t counter with even more rabid condemnations of the Black-Marxist-Nazi-Kenyan usurper.

We are approaching a presidential election year. The battle lines are drawn. How far to the right will the Republicans go? Because the Democrats don’t have to move an inch.