Can a Democrat win the Mississippi U.S. Senate race?

Political junkies are in a frenzy today because Mississippi Republican Thad Cochran won his Republican primary race Tuesday in a close race against a Tea Party firebrand.

That, to the rest of America, neither comes as a surprise nor, in reality, generates any interest anywhere. Americans aren’t at the edge of their seats wondering who would be the Republican nominee for the Mississippi U.S. Senate race.

Cochran’s opponent, state Sen. Chris McDaniel, is a Tea Party poster boy. Which means he’s pretty much a douche. How bad is he?

Well, this is a television ad that Cochran’s campaign didn’t broadcast against him:

That’s pretty insane. But how Cochran, a conservative Republican (Isn’t that redundant, though? Those are the only kinds of Republicans) won against a Tea Bagger is even crazier (from the Washington Post):

In an e-mail sent late last week, the black Democratic mayor of Vicksburg, Miss., urged 2,000 supporters to vote Tuesday for Sen. Thad Cochran, crediting the Republican for securing federal money for key local projects and calling him one of the city’s “best economic development tools.”

The voice of an African American state lawmaker was heard in a recorded phone call Tuesday asserting that Cochran stood between the state and a tea party conservative who would do away with government services. And full-page ads in black newspapers lauded the senator as a champion of historically black colleges.

An intensive strategy over the past three weeks to draw black voters to the polls and spare Cochran from what once seemed like a certain defeat at the hands of a tea party challenger in Tuesday’s GOP runoff appears to have worked.

Voter data shows that turnout rose sharply in Tuesday’s election in black areas of the state over the initial June 3 primary, a runoff made necessary when Chris McDaniel narrowly edged Cochran but was unable to win 50 percent of the vote.

That suggested that not only did traditionally Democratic black voters turn out on behalf of the state’s 76-year-old white Republican senator, but they may have provided his margin of victory.

What? I don’t get it. I mean, I do get it. It was a brilliant political move by the Cochran campaign. But let’s face it. The Republican party didn’t rise in the South because it was appealing to black voters.

Anyway, McDaniel is pissed. He refuses to concede. Something about “liberal Democrats” intruding on Republican elections.

But no laws were broken. And who’s to stop McDaniel from waging a write-in campaign in the general election.

Which brings us to the headline.

If McDaniel runs and splits the Tea Bagging crazies from the Republican Conservatives, it seems like the Democrat could actually win the damn thing in November. Unless African-American voters rally around Cochran again.

Mississippi Democrats wanted McDaniel to win, because … hell, look at the ad again. And there’s tons of additional McDaniel gems on women and minorities (he was a national right-wing talk radio phenom for a while). Given the way the GOP has consistently snatched defeat from certain victory by putting Tea Party crazies up for elections (Akin in Missouri, Mourdock in Indiana, Angle in Nevada, O’Donnell in Delaware), the Dems felt they had a shot in Mississippi.

But then, black people saved the incumbent Republican, and screwed that strategy up.

I think black voters, though, will probably go to the Democrat if this meme is passed around:

Impeachment is a two-step process that starts in the House. All it takes is a simple majority of that chamber to approve a single article of impeachment against the president for “Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” Once that happens, a president is forever branded as having been impeached. President Andrew Johnson (1868) and President Bill Clinton (1998) share that distinction. President Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 before the full House could vote to impeach him.

To officially remove a president from office, two-thirds of the Senate must vote to convict him on those articles of impeachment. Johnson and Clinton were not convicted. Obama could share the same or worse fate. A Republican-controlled Senate could lead to Obama becoming the third president impeached and the first ever to be removed from office.

 

Obama has two years left in office. Time for the Democrats in Mississippi to step up and make sure he stays there. And if I’m the Democrat in the Mississippi race and McDaniel is still running, I’m going to make sure Cochran answers the question: Would you vote to impeach President Obama? If he answers yes, let’s see how much of the black vote he keeps.

The bible says the Earth is flat …

… And in 1893, a South Dakota man put a map together to prove it (click to enlarge):

Orlando-Ferguson-flat-earth-map_editAccording to a 2011 Live Science article:

In 1893, Orlando Ferguson, a real estate developer based in South Dakota, drew a map of the Earth that combined biblical and scientific knowledge in a unique way. The map accompanied a 92-page lecture that Ferguson — referring to himself as a “professor” — delivered in town after town, traveling far and wide to share his theory of geography, highlighted by his belief that the Earth was flat.

Ferguson’s map represents the Earth as a giant, rectangular slab with a dimpled upper surface. Don Homuth of Salem, Ore., just donated one of two intact copies of the map to the Library of Congress. …

… “Ferguson was trying to make an updated version of the flat Earth theory to fit the biblical description of the Earth with known facts,” Bingham said. Typical of flat Earths, Ferguson’s Earth is a rectangular slab, the four corners of which are each guarded by an angel. “What makes his flat Earth different from other theories is his theory holds that the Earth is imprinted with an ‘inverse toroid.'” If you were to take a donut and press it into wet cement and then remove the donut, Bingham explained, the rounded impression it left in the cement would be what is known in mathematics as an inverse toroid.

“It’s pretty clever because it explains the Columbus phenomenon, where you see ships coming in over the horizon and gradually the mast gets taller and taller until you can see the ship,” Bingham said. “By 1893, most people knew about horizons so he had to come up with some way to explain that.”

There are plenty of people today who rely on the Bible as the basis of scientific fact. That’s why we have a 70,000-square-foot Creation Museum in Kentucky and people pushing intelligent design in schools. It was wrong then. It’s still wrong today.

I wasn’t going to say anything about Mickey Rooney dying …

… because I figured everyone knew who Mickey Rooney was, so why even bother?

And then I saw this:

ARE YOU KIDDING ME?

And this is why I don’t watch television news anymore. I can see maybe one person confusing Mickey Rooney (famed child actor and legendary movie star who died April 6, 2014) with Andy Rooney (famed old curmudgeon and irritating television guy who died Nov. 4, 2011). … No, strike that. I can’t see anyone confusing either of them.

This is Mickey Rooney:

This is Andy Rooney:

Jeez. I know who Lady Gaga and Ella Fitzgerald are.

But one thing for sure. Andy Rooney unlike his television brethren, knew who Mickey Rooney was.