The anatomy of a makeover movie

The makeover movie is much more enjoyable than the extreme makeovers on daily daytime television. At least you care about the people being made over in the course of the film.

By the way, the makeover of Hermoine in “The Goblet of Fire” was very well done, since you’d seen her for three previous movies. That was when I realized she wanted Ron, not Harry.

(Via Vox)

‘Shadow of a Doubt’ on the radio

I’ve said before that my favorite Alfred Hitchcock movie is “Shadow of a Doubt,” a 1943 thriller about a serial murderer of widows and the curious relation between him and his loving niece.

But what I didn’t know was that back in the 1940s and ’50s, radio plays were regularly done using popular films as the script. So I’m searching through YouTube for clips on “Shadow of a Doubt” and I find this:

I don’t know who Betsy Drake was, but Cary Grant as Uncle Charlie is an amazing find. He was in four Hitchcock movies (“Suspicion,” Notorious,” North by Northwest” and “To Catch a Thief) but it was so odd to hear him doing Joseph Cotten’s role. And even better, Hitchcock is the director!

And just as I was wowed by this version from the 1950s, I find another version done in 1944, several years earlier:

William Powell, “The Thin Man” of all people,  is Uncle Charlie. And Teresa Wright, who played young Charlie in the movie a year earlier, is of course, a great choice. The director is Cecil B. DeMille (I’m ready for my close-up, Mr. DeMille) the master of monumental movies.