This is your life, in a chart

If you are an average American, this is how your life is broken down into little boxes (of course, you can click to enlarge):

2014-07-22-4WeeksblockLIFE1The sad part is I’m more than halfway through it and not so slowly moving from red to blue. How did that happen?

I’m reminded of a Tom Lehrer line: When Mozart was my age, he had been dead for 24 years.

“Who’s Tom Lehrer?” you ask. Yes, this is a true sign of age, because not only do millennials not know who he is, A lot of baby boomers are in the dark. Here you go:

I think he’s one of the great songwriters of the 20th century. If you get a chance, check out “Werhner von Braun” and “The Vatican Rag.”

Here’s what surprises me. Tom Lehrer is still alive! He’s 86 and living in New York CIty (where else?!). Of course, that means he’s running out of chart space.

Axl Rose has the greatest voice of all time?

vocalrange_imageLike, who knew he had that kind of range (other than the millions who listen to his records)?

We all know Mariah Carey can hit the high notes. Just listen to her sing “Emotions.”

I mean that’s one of those songs when you first heard it on the car radio, you pulled over and said, “What the hell was that ??!!?”

But, as the chart above shows, Axl has a wider range. Remember “Don’t Cry”?

He’s all over the place on that one. Yes, he goes nowhere near Mariah on the high notes, but then he’s the one who hits the lowest note.

Let’s destroy the world: A musical climate change chart

It’s lovely to watch your world collapse in a graphic. I wonder what Pat Sajak would say (via MSN):

Wheel of Fortune” host Pat Sajak sparked a social media backlash Tuesday after calling people concerned about climate change “unpatriotic racists.”

“I now believe global warming alarmists are unpatriotic racists knowingly misleading for their own ends. Good night,” Sajak tweeted late Monday.

I mean, really, who are you going to believe? The world’s scientists or a game show host who emcees a sophisticated version of Hangman? And where does the idea of racism and climate change come from?

‘Get Lucky’ on ‘Soul Train’

Every now and then, I miss “Soul Train,” not because I ever could sit through the whole show, but because of the dance line. “American Bandstand” didn’t have anything like that, two kids dancing down a line while folks on the line keep the beat going.

There’s no particular reason I’m thinking about this, other than I’m another year older and thinking about the past. But wouldn’t it be cool to watch kids dance to today’s music?

Soul Train (1971-2006)