Man and nature

I’m a firm believer that it isn’t going to be aliens who stomp humanity. It’s going to be something we created.

Because when Skynet becomes self aware or when we get sucked into the Matrix,  someone’s going to ask the computers how do we fix the planet? The answer’s going to be, “Get rid of the humans.”

And when it comes to protecting the planet, humans keep showing they have the morality of Peter Lorre’s character in “M”.

Rupert Murdoch’s National Geographic

1255ckCOMIC-national-geografoxBecause, people, it is now RUPERT MURDOCH’S National Geographic:

The iconic ­yellow-bordered magazine, beset by financial issues, entered its own uncharted territory. In an effort to stave off further decline, the magazine was effectively sold by its nonprofit parent organization to a for-profit venture whose principal shareholder is one of Rupert Murdoch’s global media companies.

In exchange for $725 million, the National Geographic Society passed the troubled magazine and its book, map and other media assets to a partnership headed by 21st Century Fox, the Murdoch-controlled company that owns the 20th Century Fox movie studio, the Fox television network and Fox News Channel.

Some more stories we can look forward to:



Time Machine: San Francisco 1906

I haven’t done a Time Machine entry in a while, so here’s a look at life in America more than 100 years ago. This is Market Street in San Francisco, on April 14, 1906, as taken from the front of a trolley car. Horse drawn carriages, cars dodging in and out without any sense of safety and people just walking in the middle of the street. Also notice how well-dressed folks are.

The first thing that strikes me is the total anarchy of the street. The automobile drivers are lunatics. People just walk out in the middle of the street. Kids play chicken with the trolley. How many bodies were they picking up off the streets every day? This is not safe. But you sense this is what life was like throughout American cities. The streets were packed and lawless. People survived.

Some history, from YouTube:

The origin of the film was an enigma for many decades, and it was long thought to have been shot in September of 1905, after being dated as such by the Library of Congress based on the state of construction of several buildings. However, in 2009 and 2010, film historian David Kiehn, co-founder of Niles Film Museum in Niles, California, dated the film to the spring of 1906 from automobile registrations and weather records. Kiehn eventually found promotional materials from the film’s original release and dated the film to April 14th, 1906, and finally gave credit to the filmmakers, the Mills Brothers.

Four days later, the great San Francisco Earthquake hit. Thousands dead. The city destroyed.

And the city looked like this:

It’s the same route, but notice that the film is reversed.