The dark secret of Obamacare, as seen by the GOP

A Republican congresswoman, whom I’ve never hear of before (Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington), put up a Facebook post asking people to relay their Obamacare nightmares, because, according to the GOP, Obamacare is nothing but a nightmare. I’m not exaggerating. Here’s what she said:

This week marks the 5th anniversary of #Obamacare being signed into law. Whether it’s turned your tax filing into a nightmare, you’re facing skyrocketing premiums, or your employer has reduced your work hours, I want to hear about it.

Please share your story with me so that I can better understand the challenges you’re facing: http://mcmorris.house.gov/your-story/

So people responded:

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Oops. Not quite the nightmare, huh. So what’s a Republican to do?

Well, try clicking on the link above that directs you to Rodgers’s Facebook page, where people are posting their nightmare. Nevermind, here’s what you’ll see (click to enlarge):

facebook sorry copy

You’ve got to admire the integrity of Republicans. By the way, I didn’t follow the link because Rodgers isn’t a source I can trust.

I read elsewhere that Rodgers did manage to come up with a couple of nightmares. One was from a woman in her 60s who said she could not longer afford care. Turns out the reason is because the woman lives in a Republican state, where the GOP made sure that Medicaid expansion, a planned element of the Affordable Care Act, wasn’t approved.

Obama in Selma

On March 7, 1965, about 600 people gathered to march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala.

This is what happened:

It’s important to remember the history to fully appreciate Obama’s words. Some of us are old enough to remember when this happened. A lot of us weren’t even alive then and see it as ancient history.

Fifty years is a lifetime. But for some of us who watched the persecution and the beatings on television that night a half century ago, it really was only yesterday.

The effects of Krugmanization on the stupid rich

A meditation on the stupid rich by Paul Krugman:

It’s yet another illustration of one of the remarkable revelations of recent years, the incredibly sensitive feelings of the superrich, who are so hurt at any suggestion that great wealth does not also go with great wisdom and great virtue that they threaten to take the economy with them and go home.
But we must make fun of such people — and not just because, I admit, it’s one of the pleasures of life. Let me quote from a wonderful essay by Molly Ivins (read the whole thing):

Satire is a weapon, and it can be quite cruel. It has historically been the weapon of powerless people aimed at the powerful.

… Making fun of billionaires who are clueless about economics, and lack the menschood to admit their mistakes, serves a couple of functions. It reminds the audience that being rich doesn’t mean that you know what you’re talking about; it also provides other rich people some incentive to think before they speak, and maybe even do some homework before preaching to the rest of us. I’m snarky for a reason.

What prompted this observation was a stupid rich person who said that hyperinflation in America is obvious if you’d just look at the rise in the prices of houses and high-end art in London, Manhattan and the Hamptons. It’s something I’m sure that keeps you all awake at night.

But let’s also remember that the reason prices in Manhattan, London and the Hamptons (hell, let’s add Washington, D.C., to the list) are shooting up for those obsessed with luxury living is because the rich have taken all the money.

Just one more thing. The results of last week’s elections mean the rules aren’t going to change anytime soon. Mocking the stupid rich is the only recourse we have right now.