Remember when Africans immigrated to the U.S. as workers on plantations?

Because that’s what textbooks are teaching children:

1460786346572746530Of course, this was found in a Texas textbook, but the book is used throughout the country:

In a section titled “Patterns of Immigration,” a speech bubble pointing to a U.S. map read: “The Atlantic Slave Trade between the 1500s and 1800s brought millions of workers from Africa to the southern United States to work on agricultural plantations.” …

One parent posted the atrocity to Facebook:

In calling slaves “workers” and their move to the United States “immigration,” she noted in viral Facebook posts Wednesday and Thursday, the textbook suggests not only that her African American ancestors arrived on the continent willingly, but also that they were compensated for their labor.

Immigration? Workers? How about “Kidnapped millions who were crammed in horrid conditions on a boat across the ocean.” And “sold into slavery”?

Some things to keep in mind about high school science

Especially if you’re a child of color.

1) Kiera Wilmot’s curiosity wasn’t destructive.

2) Ahmed Mohamed’s homemade clock wasn’t a bomb.

So let’s hire teachers who are intelligent enough to look at these things and say, that’s impressive, instead of a bunch of cowardly dunces who feel it’s their primary duty to call the police because brown kids are intelligent.

(Just for the record, it comes as no surprise these atrocities happened in Florida and Texas.)

The paragraph that was edited out of the Declaration of Independence

When Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence, he included this paragraph in the Colonies’ grievance against King George III of England:

He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation hither … And he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us, and to purchase that liberty of which he had deprived them, by murdering the people upon whom he also obtruded them: thus paying off former crimes committed against the liberties of one people, with crimes which he urges them to commit against the lives of another.

This didn’t make it into the final draft. Possibly because it’s contradictory (condemning slavery then condemning slaves for not wanting to be in slavery). And not to mention bit of hypocrisy (the king doesn’t want us to have liberty, and we don’t want the slaves to be free).

So, let’s do away with the idea that the founding fathers held opinions that were sacred and should always be the foundation for avoiding change in the 21st century (Justice Scalia), and let’s remember that despite their flaws, the founding fathers did come up with a document that we nevertheless honor and celebrate 239 years after it was proclaimed to the public.

Oh, and, let’s remember what Jefferson said about the future:



(More on the deleted paragraph at Talking Points Memo.)



Meanwhile, in the Democratic presidential race

Bernie Sanders, the Vermont Independent, seeking the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party. Is drawing large crowds, and we haven’t been hearing about it because everyone thinks Hillary Clinton has her party’s nomination locked up, and folks like Donald Trump have given the GOP process the appeal of a car wreck on a highway (You can’t help but watch).

But Sanders drew about 10,000 at a rally in Madison, Wis.

That’s probably the largest crowd at any rally so far this campaign season:

There’s definitely a clear message coming from the Sanders campaign, and it fired up the cheeseheads. Let’s see how it resonates across the country.