Policing vs. murder

This is how British police deal with a man threatening them with a machete:

This is how American cops deal with a kid avoiding them with a knife:

One of these methods is called taking control of a dangerous situation. The other is called cold-blooded murder.

As of today, 884 people have been shot dead by police in America. Many of those incidents have been ruled as justified. But 82 of the incidents involved people who weren’t armed, Including this one:

Jeremy Mardis, an unarmed 6-year-old white male, was shot on Nov. 3, 2015, in Marksville, La. Marksville marshals were pursuing the boy’s father, Chris Few. Few fled and marshals opened fire on his car, killing Jeremy, who was a passenger in the front seat.

Law enforcement in America has a world-wide reputation for excessive force. If you don’t believe that, listen to the Brits who are filming the guy with the machete.

If the guy with the machete was in America, he would have been dead before the guy taking the video would have had his camera out. The kid in Chicago in the second video was shot less than 30 seconds after the cop with the gun arrived. Only one cop did the shooting. Fired 18 times. Unloaded his clip. And he was reloading his weapon when the other officers must have yelled, “what the hell are you doing?”

Our Thanksgiving paradox

An interesting opening sentence involving Thanksgiving that my son referred me to on the website Five Thirty Eight:

Thanksgiving — when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores — is once again upon us.

Very appropriate, but my problem is that I thought too much about it. Because the reality is, it would have been better for the natives if they had kept the refugees out.


An overstatement? Not really. Here’s a video on display at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian involving what the first European immigrants did to the people who had lived here for centuries.

Just to clarify, this is not an anti-immigrant post.

It’s just an observation that there is absolutely nothing today’s immigrants can do that’s worse than what the original immigrants to this country have already done.


Some very strange views on discrimination

Anything new in the world of delusion?

In a new poll released by the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) on Tuesday, a whopping 43 percent of Americans told researchers that discrimination against whites has become as large a problem as discrimination against blacks and other minority groups. And an even bigger share of Americans — 53 percent — told pollsters American culture and “way of life” have mostly changed for the worse since 1950.

Do they even have a clue of what life was like in the 1950s and earlier?


Are they offended because they can’t do this openly anymore?


Are they saying this is not as bad as what they are experiencing today?


Who exactly is saying that discrimination against whites has become as large a problem as discrimination against blacks and other minority groups?


So, it’s the usual suspects.

Kentucky Maps That Make the Rude Pundit Want to Drink Moonshine Until He’s Blind

I’m still trying to figure out how poor people in bad health in Kentucky decided they wanted a Republican governor who promised to take away their health insurance.

The Rude Pundit explained it to me:

So people who have less than nothing would rather have their cancer go untreated than take Medicaid from a Negro or allow two people of the same sex to get married. That is about as delusional and pathetic as it gets and, frankly, so gut-level, depressingly dumb that, on his crueler days, the Rude Pundit thinks it’d be just fine for them all to get sick and die and raise the intelligence of the species just a bit. Hell, they pretty much just admitted that they’re cool with that.

But here’s the thing: The country will not move forward without an appeal to the gut-level stupid. Forget the fucked-in-the-brain-by-religion crowd. They’re out of reach. But there is a contingent of the rural poor that can be reached and can be brought into the fold. It’s just been too long without any real effort to do so, not during the Reagan or Bush or Clinton or Bush II years and not as much as needed during the Obama administration.

Sure, it’d be easy to say, “Well, let ’em freeze to death in a ditch with their single tooth.” Except for shit like this very election, shit that keeps happening, that happened in 2014, too, shit that has an effect on the House of Representatives, for instance. That has to do with the lives of you and, more importantly, the Rude Pundit.

The stupid people aren’t going away. We just haven’t figured out how to make them less stupid.

Here’s a map of the election results. Typical blue and red designations:

ky election

And here’s a map of where Medicaid is used the most in the state. The more brown, the more Medicaid:

ky medicaid

So most of the places that rely on Medicaid thought it was a good idea to vote for the guy who said he would get rid of the healthcare they rely on. That means they are more likely to die. That’s what getting rid of the state exchange means.

And they knew that’s what he was going to do. I voted in the Kentucky election and I saw the ads. It wasn’t something Matt Blevin, the Republican governor-elect, was trying to sneak through.

So what’s drove them to vote for that? The Washington Post took a look at that today:

Dennis Blackburn has this splintered self-interest. The 56-year-old mechanic hasn’t worked in 18 months, since he lost his job at a tire company that supplies a diminishing number of local coal mines. “The old guy had to go home,” Blackburn says of his layoff.

He has a hereditary liver disorder, numbness in his hands and legs, back pain from folding his 6-foot-1-inch frame into 29-inch mine shafts as a young man, plus an abnormal heart rhythm — the likely vestige of having been struck by lightning 15 years ago in his tin-roofed farmhouse.

Blackburn was making small payments on an MRI he’d gotten at Pikeville Medical Center, the only hospital in a 150-mile radius, when he heard about Big Sandy’s Shelby Valley Clinic. There he met Fleming, who helped him sign up for one of the managed-care Medicaid plans available in Kentucky.

On Election Day, Blackburn voted for Bevin because he is tired of career politicians and thought a businessman would be more apt to create the jobs that Pike County so needs. Yet when it comes to the state’s expansion of health insurance, “it doesn’t look to me as if he understands,” Blackburn said. “Without this little bit of help these people are giving me, I could probably die. . . . It’s not right to not understand something but want to stamp it out.”

I don’t know what to say. The guy just signed his own death warrant. He doesn’t realize that Blevin fully understands what he’s doing. This isn’t a case of a politician being misguided, because he absolutely believes the poor are moochers and are better off dead.

Maybe it’s for the best. Sometimes, you’ve got to thin out the herd.

Matt Blevin Source: Kentucky Maps That Make the Rude Pundit Want to Drink Moonshine Until He’s Blind

Remember when Africans immigrated to the U.S. as workers on plantations?

Because that’s what textbooks are teaching children:

1460786346572746530Of course, this was found in a Texas textbook, but the book is used throughout the country:

In a section titled “Patterns of Immigration,” a speech bubble pointing to a U.S. map read: “The Atlantic Slave Trade between the 1500s and 1800s brought millions of workers from Africa to the southern United States to work on agricultural plantations.” …

One parent posted the atrocity to Facebook:

In calling slaves “workers” and their move to the United States “immigration,” she noted in viral Facebook posts Wednesday and Thursday, the textbook suggests not only that her African American ancestors arrived on the continent willingly, but also that they were compensated for their labor.

Immigration? Workers? How about “Kidnapped millions who were crammed in horrid conditions on a boat across the ocean.” And “sold into slavery”?