What it’s like to travel in time

So, I’m walking down the street in San Francisco today, and all of a sudden, I’m thinking, “I’ve been here before,” which is impossible because I’ve never been here before.

But I knew the street. When I got to the end, I saw this:

And that’s when I realized I had been here in my time machine, because I posted this in January:

The sense of being there was so real because I had been so fascinated with this video when I first saw it.

Taking it slowly … on TV

When I lived in Europe, one of my favorite TV shows was called Trains, Trains, Trains. It featured video of German trains. No narration. No music. Just being in a train while it moved along its route. The perspective was from the motorman’s seat and you’re just watching the track ahead as the train moved on. Sometimes it was a streetcar.

It was very soothing.

I couldn’t find anything like it when I got back to the states. Then I got the Pluto TV app and saw that one of the feeds on it was for something called Slow TV. That’s from Norway. Here’s how it works:

So, let’s take a ride. See you in about 7 hours:

Rush hour nightmares

This is a fictional representation of rush hour traffic:

This is a real rush hour in London:

The rush hour in London was shot around the time I lived there. So at some point, I was on the trains, or crossing the Millennium Bridge or walking across London Bridge or on a double decker bus with the rest of the people in these shots.

This is rush hour on a bike in New York City:

I’ve done this, too, and the secret is, it’s always rush hour in New York City.

And this is rush hour on a bike in D.C.

I bike daily in Washington, and this guy is totally irresponsible. I know where he’s going and there are plenty of bike lanes, so he shouldn’t be weaving through cars and running red lights or hopping on the sidewalk.

And this is what I go through every day in D.C., because this is about a block from my office.

How’s your commute?