Roger Ailes, serial sexual harasser, dies at 77

The man who created Fox News is dead:

Roger Ailes, who built Fox News into a cable powerhouse before leaving the company last year, died Thursday morning at the age of 77.

The Ohio-born television pioneer was a confidant of presidents and an acknowledged master of communications. He founded Fox News in 1996 and built it into the nation’s long-running No. 1 cable news network.  Ailes resigned from Fox in July amid charges of sexual harassment.

Yeah, that’s right. I linked to Fox News because the pump truppets won’t believe it otherwise.

There are all kinds of things I could say, but I’ll defer to Tengrain at Mock, Paper, Scissors:

There is nothing nice I could say about him when he was alive, so there is nothing nice I can say about him now. There is probably no one more responsible for the toxic divide in this country than Roger Ailes.

I wish for Ailes everything he ever wished for us on the left.

I will note one thing, though. According to the lying New York Times:

The cause was complications of a subdural hematoma that Mr. Ailes sustained when he fell and struck his head on May 10 at his home in Palm Beach, Fla., the local authorities said.

This means that if he hadn’t been a sexual harasser, he would have instead been at work at Fox headquarters in New York the day he fell, and he would be alive today.

So Karma is a bitch. And she got even with him for sticking his slimy tongue on her face.

Sharknado is real!

Link provided by Gizmodo.

A bull shark has become an unexpected victim of Cyclone Debbie after it was found dead in floodwaters in north Queensland.

The metre-and-a-half bull shark was discovered on Thursday morning in a puddle in Ayr, a town of Burdekin, just north of where Debbie made landfall earlier this week.

It is believed the shark possibly became stranded as water surged through the area, causing pockets of flooding.

No. Not pockets of flooding. This is what happened!

Colbert on the Trump news conference

I watched the press conference and read the transcript and can honestly say Stephen Colbert isn’t even close to the magnitude of crazy that was the Lügenduck. It really was more like this:

gkr542vI’ve been watching press conferences for more than 50 years, and this was the first time I was absolutely sure that the Secret Service needed to bring out a straightjacket and carry that lunatic off the stage.

But the reaction of the pump truppets?

17-metro2That’s the New York Post. It’s owned by illegal immigrant and virgin-blood sucker Rupert Murdoch. The truppets loved it.

This is what’s happening in the Oval Office

gkr542vThe Lügenduck tweets:

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Because he really understands the concept of classified information:

Korea launched a ballistic missile that traveled over 300 miles before crashing into the Sea of Japan—far enough to hint at the ability to drop a nuke on one of the US’ closest allies.

Naturally, President Trump discussed the matter with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who was visiting the US, and National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. But here’s the problem: He did so in full view of guests at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, with smartphone cameras and flashlights pointed at presumably sensitive material.

On Monday, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said that “no classified material” was shared at dinner, and that the president had received an intelligence briefing beforehand in an on-site Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility, a specially outfitted room with one purpose: Keep out the spies.

Whatever comfort that reassurance affords, it doesn’t change the reality that a high-level diplomatic conversation took place that night in full view of waitstaff and nearby diners—at least one of whom posted about the show on social media.

“It was fascinating to watch the flurry of activity at dinner when the news came that North Korea had launched a missile in the direction of Japan,” wrote Richard DeAgazio in his now-private Facebook caption. A briefing may have happened in the SCIF, but plenty of discussion happened outside of it, too. The documents in Trump’s hands may not have been classified, but Flynn and White House adviser Stephen Bannon deemed them important enough to huddle over.

If the bulk of the president’s security discussions took place in a SCIF, great. If even a small portion of them didn’t, Trump and his team took an inexcusable risk with national security.