Babyman’s tariffs

Another way for him to lash out without knowing what he’s doing.


Rich boy’s health clinics

And this is because…?

The announcement of earlier this week that, JP Morgan Chase and Berkshire Hathaway are forming a non-profit company to try to improve the American healthcare system caused some ripples in the stock market; the mere specter of its disruptive potential was enough to send some investors scurrying away from large payer providers like UnitedHealth, Aetna and Humana. …

It is worth considering the perspectives that the titans who lead the collaborating firms bring to this effort. While consistently bemoaning the aggregate costs of healthcare, Warren Buffett supports broader access for all and criticized attempts to repealPresident Obama’s Affordable Care Act. In the announcement, Buffett notably said that “[t}he ballooning costs of healthcare act as a hungry tapeworm on the American economy.” Berkshire is, among other things, a major insurance company that could structure and offer different kinds of coverage to its own employees and others. JP Morgan’s Jamie Dimon is a cancer survivor who has spoken passionately about the importance of supporting biomedical innovation while controlling costs. Jeff Bezos founded a company that is a testament to the power of harnessing software and information analytics to fundamentally change how the masses acquire goods and services. He also happens to publish The Washington Post and has some ability, therefore, to influence public policy.

Do the right thing

This should be common knowledge by now:

But when it’s presented this way, something clicked for me and I flashed on this:

The mango-hued babyman isn’t going to do the right thing. He’s busy lining his pockets with government cash by putting his business interests above the interests of the American people. His IKEA cabinet is doing everything it can to wreck American lives. And his loyal army of empty headed pump truppets are going to support their team while the team leaders do everything they can to turn back progress that has saved and protected those who need it the most.

People overseas don’t trust this administration to do the right thing. Everyone in this country should know by now that the disaster of November 2016 is not going to lead to the right thing being done.

We’ve got to fight the powers that be.

Kicking a competitor while it’s down

Actually, my headline is unfair. Because United kicks passengers while they’re down.

And it’s really not a Southwest ad. It’s just a mockup by a jokester. Kind of like this one:

And this one:

But this is all deserved, because the United CEO started the day in pure douchebag mode:

And as we all know, this message to the staff was bullshit, because we’ve all seen the video. Wall Street thought so, too:

And in a capitalist society, what Wall Street say carries a lot more weight than what paying passengers say. Here’s the second attempt at a United apology:

Statement from United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz on United Express Flight 3411

April 11, 2017

The truly horrific event that occurred on this flight has elicited many responses from all of us: outrage, anger, disappointment. I share all of those sentiments, and one above all: my deepest apologies for what happened. Like you, I continue to be disturbed by what happened on this flight and I deeply apologize to the customer forcibly removed and to all the customers aboard. No one should ever be mistreated this way.  

I want you to know that we take full responsibility and we will work to make it right.  

It’s never too late to do the right thing. I have committed to our customers and our employees that we are going to fix what’s broken so this never happens again. This will include a thorough review of crew movement, our policies for incentivizing volunteers in these situations, how we handle oversold situations and an examination of how we partner with airport authorities and local law enforcement. We’ll communicate the results of our review by April 30th. 

I promise you we will do better. 



Too late, buddy. This is what you should have said before the plane left Chicago.