Republicans are fine with having a peeping Tom pedophile as their presidential candidate

The latest horror from the rotting Halloween Trumpkin:

Four women who competed in the 1997 Miss Teen USA beauty pageant said Donald Trump walked into the dressing room while contestants — some as young as 15 — were changing.

“I remember putting on my dress really quick because I was like, ‘Oh my god, there’s a man in here,’” said Mariah Billado, the former Miss Vermont Teen USA.

Trump, she recalled, said something like, “Don’t worry, ladies, I’ve seen it all before.”

Three other women, who asked to remain anonymous for fear of getting engulfed in a media firestorm, also remembered Trump entering the dressing room while girls were changing. Two of them said the girls rushed to cover their bodies, with one calling it “shocking” and “creepy.” The third said she was clothed and introduced herself to Trump.

Yes, we knew he owned the pageants and that he would time going into the dressing rooms when the women were preparing for the bathing suit competitions, the times they were most likely to be unclothed.

But to do this at the Teen USA pageant, when the youngest contestant can be 14, has to be grounds for throwing this pervert in jail.

And for all of you alt-right zombies who say this is just another effort by the media to smear your virtuous champion:

This is what he did at the Miss Teen USA pageant. He was going in to the dressing room to gawk at half dressed or nude children.

If you think we’ve hit rock bottom with this guy, keep in mind there’s a thing called a bottomless pit. There cannot be a big enough electoral landslide to bury this vat of oozing puss and every one of his craven supporters in Congress. Like this guy:

The creepy clown breakdown

Well, this came out of nowhere:

Turns out that people with a lot of face makeup and bizarre, billowy hair aren’t just frightening America from debate podiums.

Creepy clowns, the ones with squirting flowers — not flags — on their lapels, are becoming a scourge across the country.

From Virginia to Florida to Ohio, police are getting calls about threatening men dressed up as clowns luring children into the woods with money, running around with machetes, pipes, knives or even guns and generally scaring the bejesus out of everybody.

OK, weird, but is it really a national concern?

During a news conference, a Bloomberg reporter asked White House press secretary Josh Earnest if President Obama was aware of the clown reports and associated arrests. Earnest said he did not know if the president had been briefed on creepy clowns, and deferring to the FBI and Department of Homeland Security on the jester specifics.

What’s going on with this clown obsession? The clowns of my childhood weren’t scary. They were happy, like this guy:


Bozo the Clown


Did I completely miss that 50 years ago? In my mind, back then, if Bozo showed up in a van and offered candy to get in, I’d have gone for the candy. I mean, what if there was candy in the van?

I was cool with clowns until this guy showed up:


This is Pogo the Clown, better know as John Wayne Gacy. Back in the 1970s, he killed 33 teenage boys and young men in Illinois. One of his lures was “the handcuff trick.” You can figure out what that was, and that it wasn’t a good idea to let him do that to you. But we don’t have to worry about him anymore. He was executed in 1994.

By the time Stephen King released “It,” his killer clown story, in the mid-’80s, I realized that a lot of the greasepaint guys and gals were creepy.

Then clown porn came along the whole clown concept was over as far as I was concerned.

Anyway, King is telling us to relax:

But, really, why is everyone freaking out over clowns in 2016? What has happened on the national scene that has gotten people so upset they’re spotting dangerous clowns all over the country?


Now you understand. It’s Freudian, but it’s true.

Meanwhile, I’m reposting my favorite creepy clown video:

Now that’s a clown that’ll give you nightmares.

The view from Trump Tower

1303ckcomic-view-from-trump-towerThis is a pretty accurate representation of how the soulless yam sees the rest of the world.

And just as a reminder: If you think the GOP could have come up with a more acceptable candidate for president, here’s a look at one of the last Republicans standing during the primaries, the governor from the land of the Saps (based on the above map):

John Kasich waded into the [New Hampshire] state primary last week, endorsing Republican Chris Sununu at the Legislative Office Building in Concord. The former presidential candidate then promptly stole the spotlight.

Following the announcement, the Ohio governor toured downtown Exeter with Sununu and his posse in tow. Inside a bookstore he didn’t much discuss Sununu’s candidacy. Instead he looked at the latest Harry Potter book and pondered why British actor Daniel Radcliffe is an atheist. Then he wondered aloud which Olympians would find success after the recent Rio games.

“You know that Daniel Radcliffe has declared himself an atheist?” Kasich said to no one in particular. “I’m serious. What a weird thing. Why would a guy who has had all that success just, I mean, what the hell is wrong with him?”

Yes, when they think of Harry Potter, some in the alt-right freak out over witchcraft:

But this guy talks about atheism.

And he was considered the sane Republican.


Here’s why Kim Kardashian is famous

It’s actually an interesting explanation of fame in the Internet age:

I was watching the ESPN documentary on O.J. Simpson and surprisingly remembered that Kardashian was an important name during the murder trial. Robert Kardashian was O.J.’s friend and one of his defense attorneys.

That’s Kim’s father. And it’s not like this was a passing acquaintance:

So, in addition to O.J. getting away with murder, he brought us the Kardashians,

Time Machine: A 1997 NCAA basketball tournament upset

The NCAA basketball season is over, and the end of the Villanova game was spectacular. But games are always better when you have a rooting interest.

So I thought back to the first time I went to an NCAA tournament game ,because it was a family affair;

My nephew was one of the players on the 15-seed Coppin State Eagles when they beat the 2-seed South Carolina Gamecocks in 1997. I remember being in the stands and rooting my head off.

But this is the first time I’ve actually seen the game. A videotape has been floating around the family for almost 20 years, but I just never got the chance to watch it. So today, I go to YouTube, and there it is.

You know, when you’re at the arena, you witness what’s going on, but it’s all hazy, because, when you’re really into it, you’re yelling and jumping up and down, and screaming at the refs and are basically caught up in the insanity of it all.

Like I remember that Coppin State was such a small school, it didn’t have its own band, so it borrowed the band from Morgan State, on the other side of Baltimore. I remember the cheerleaders didn’t have the elaborate routines that South Carolina had. And I remember being with family: my 6-year-old son, my brothers and sisters, nieces and nephews.

But actually watching the televised game, and hearing the commentators say my nephew’s game, and looking at the crowd shots where I see me and my family going nuts in the crowd almost two decades ago makes me think of broadcasts and movies as little time machines where you can go back into the past and relive some of the greatest moments in your life.

Today, my son is all grown and as tall as the players you see on the court, but he was so tiny then. Some of my family members are no longer with us, but I can see them, right there in Pittsburgh so full of life. And strangely, I don’t believe it, but I look the same as I do now.

What’s that all about?