A drunken interpretation of the election of 1800

Considering the campaign, Adams seems really restrained, because he didn’t go the “Jefferson is banging his slaves” route, which not only would have rallied colonial pump truppets to the streets with pitchforks and torches, but also was true.

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Grape expectations

Business Insider has put together a map ranking wine consumption by state. Here are the results:

imageOK. That looks like New Hampshire is the winner, but it’s not.

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The winner is Washington, D.C. So this chart tells me that the District of Columbia gets so drunk, it thinks it’s a state.

Meanwhile, let’s look at the biggest wine consumers in the world:

image-2All right, wild guess. That looks like France leads the way. Of course, I’m wrong again:

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Vatican City? Well, OK, yeah, that’s a country, and a not very sober one, but in a place with only 800 people, I’m sure the wine industry isn’t running special ads to get more Vaticaners (is that what you call a resident of The Vatican?) to buy more wine before it’s time.

And Andorra? Isn’t that like a suburb of France and Spain?

Hungry like ‘the Wolf’

I saw this movie a couple of weeks ago, and really enjoyed it:

It was truly a celebration of rich people behaving badly, and Leonardo DiCaprio was excellent in it.

Technically, it’s not supposed to be an inspirational movie. You know, bad people doing bad things and all that. Apparently, some stock brokers don’t see it that way (from the London Evening Standard):

Cinemas across London are preparing to welcome thousands of bankers, brokers and traders to bespoke private screenings, the Standard has learned, and a cinema booking company says there is more corporate demand for this film than any they can remember.

With one company planning to dress up Nineties Wall Street-style for the occasion, the City’s buzz about [Jordan] Belfort has the ring of an enthronement. It is tempting to think that DiCaprio’s character might be a new cult hero for a new generation of bankers, as Gordon Gekko (protagonist of 1987’s Wall Street) was to their bosses. You can imagine the Square Mile’s new generation quoting Belfort’s corny phrases about money, drugs and women like their pre-crash predecessors did Gekko’s.

A comedy email flying around between bankers in London and New York this week makes the link, plotting a market index since the Eighties with arrows showing major price falls on the release dates of Wall Street and its 2010 sequel Money Never Sleeps, and a Wolf of Wall Street arrow pointing at today’s high price. Will the Wolf consign so many bankers and traders to therapy and rehab that the markets will plummet on its release, the jokes goes. At least I think it’s a joke.

For those of you not familiar with international financial markets, “the City” referred to here isn’t London. The City is what the Brits call their version of Wall Street. They’re treating this movie like it’s a blueprint for success. Maybe they’re thinking all they have to avoid will be the drugs, the prostitutes and the money laundering. That way, they can steal people’s money legally, I guess.

Oh, by the way. The Wolf lives. Jordan Belfort is now a motivational speaker in California. Here’s an interview with him:

Got to admit. The guy is smooth.