Elon Musk says we’re living in a simulation

For those of you who don’t know:

Elon Reeve Musk (born June 28, 1971) is a South African-born Canadian-American business magnate, engineer and inventor.

He is the founder, CEO and CTO of SpaceX; co-founder, CEO and product architect of Tesla Motors; co-founder and chairman of SolarCity, co-chairman of OpenAI; co-founder of Zip2; and founder of X.com which merged with PayPal of Confinity. As of June 2016, he has an estimated net worth of US$12.7 billion, making him the 83rd wealthiest person in the world.

Musk has stated that the goals of SolarCity, Tesla Motors, and SpaceX revolve around his vision to change the world and humanity. His goals include reducing global warming through sustainable energy production and consumption, and reducing the “risk of human extinction” by “making life multiplanetary” by setting up a human colony on Mars.

In addition to his primary business pursuits, he has also envisioned a high-speed transportation system known as the Hyperloop, and has proposed a VTOL supersonic jetaircraft with electric fan propulsion, known as the Musk electric jet.

Now, let’s think about this simulation.

Because isn’t that what Musk is saying?

OK, here’s where I see the flaw. If this is a simulation, it makes no sense to have suffering or death. Since it’s a program, all of that is a simple matter of coding. Remove that part of the program, and everyone is in paradise. What would be wrong with that?

Now if the programmers tens of thousands of years from now designing this simulation surrounding us are including death and suffering as part of the program, then they’re just being assholes, playing God because it amuses them. And based on some of the news stories we see each day, the programmers are sick and twisted assholes.

And this takes Musk’s simulation theory out of the realm of science and into the philosophy of religion: The programmer of the future is an all seeing and all knowing being deciding who gets pain and joy, poverty and wealth, weakness and power, and death and life.

If simulation theory is your religion, it’s no different than Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Scientology or any other belief structure based on a higher being who determines your fate.

For some people, that provides a solace, but it also creates conditions where no one is responsible for their actions because everything has already been determined.

And, isn’t this whole discussion just one of those “first world” problems, anyway?

In the real world, a mother trying to feed her starving baby in Appalachia, or a father moving his family from a war zone to a safe country has no time to be reassured that their suffering or the danger around them is just a simulation.

It’s reality, and reality sucks for a lot of people.

(While I’m writing this, a character in “The Sims” is wondering, “Is this just a simulation?” …

And the Sims programmer has included anxiety and death in the program. it turns out that today’s programmers are being sick and twisted assholes. Like the ones in the future?)

Yes, you have too much information online

For proof, let’s look at Tom in Belgium:

This isn’t an exaggeration. Four years ago, I posted this:

Both are from Safe Internetbanking, in Belgium. We worry about the government spying on us, when in reality every business has everything it needs to know about you. Obviously, you know this because you see what happens online when you look at an ad or order anything. The next day, all of the advertisements you see online are related to the thing you bought the day before. And since the government and businesses know everything about you, how hard is it for a hacker to take your life over?

The Europeans are far more strict on Internet privacy, and look what happened to these people. Imagine what happens in the U.S. Checkout the Safe Internetbanking site. It has some good advice.

The Panama Papers and piggy banks

You’ve probably heard some talk about something called the Panama Papers, which sounds like someone has been rolling joints, but involves rolling bank accounts.

Anyway, since it’s complicated and involve god awful sums of money but very rich people who are doing things legally and illegally, here’s an explanation that we all can understand. (Via Vox).

The truly tragic figure in the life of Harry Potter

It would have been fascinating to have a Harry Potter movie from Severus Snape’s point of view. It would have been excruciatingly sad.

When I watched the series and Remus said Dumbledore trusted Snape, it hit me that I had to trust Snape as well. And I understood Dumbledore’s death when it happened because I figured out that Snape was in on a much bigger plan.

Alan Rickman, who brought the Half-Blood Prince to life, died last week at the age of 69 of cancer.