A matter of perspective: When ‘Man of Steel’ destroyed Metropolis

If you saw “Man of Steel,” you definitely remember an insane battle of supermen through Metropolis.

So let’s combine that scene with the opening of “Batman v. Superman” where we saw how it all looked to those mere humans standing in the streets:

Or perhaps look from this perspective:

And now you understand why the Bat wanted Supe dead.

Cinema’s first Lois Lane dies at 95

Noel Neill died. When you think of classic Superman, she was the actress who was consistent throughout television and movies, because she was the first Lois Lane and had some link to the franchise for at least 7 decades.

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In 1948, she appeared in the “Superman” movie serial with Kirk Alyn. They did two serials. Then television came along and “Adventures of Superman” featured Phyllis Coates in its first season. She left the show, and the studio had Neill reprise her movie role for 78 episodes.

But that wasn’t the last we saw of Lois/Noel.

If you paid close attention to the first “Superman” movie with Christopher Reeve in 1978, you’ll notice a scene when a young Clark Kent races a train. A girl looks out of the train window. That’s a young Lois Lane. And the woman  with her playing her mother? That’s Noel Neill.

And in 2006’s “Superman Returns,” there’s a wealthy old woman who dies at the beginning and leaves her fortune to Lex Luthor. The actress was Noel Neill.

Of course, she appeared in numerous other television and movie roles. But she’s the Lois Lane of all Lois Lanes.

She died Sunday in Tucson.

Olivia de Havilland is 100 years old

As she readily admitted to Vogue, people thought she was dead:

“I have the idea that anyone who has ever heard my name has the distinct impression that I was put under the sod years ago just before they buried Lillian Russell. And so, when I wonder if you know that I live in France, I’m sure you don’t, because I am certain that you think me peacefully interred, and in good old native American soil. If that’s the case, you’re in for a surprise.”

Five time Oscar nominee. Two time winner (for “The Heiress in 1950 and “To Each His Own” in 1947. Melanie Hamilton in “Gone With the Wind,” for which she got a supporting actor Oscar nod. . A true movie legend. She has to be the last of the greats. So let’s see her in action: