A children’s movie for Hookerpiss’s America

The Lügenorange and his pump truppets are all about making America great again. They never gave us a time when it was great (because they’re stupid and it’s always been great), but they keep insinuating that the time was when everybody knew their place. Which I guess places that in the early to middle 20th century, perhaps, because in the ’50s and ’60s, shit started to get real?

So here’s the kiddie entertainment they so yearn for, from the 1940s.

OK. So the crows are black and talking jive. And when the main crow wakes up the sleepers, the mouse says “What are you boys doing down here anyway?”

Boys, huh? OK, we’ll let that slide for now.

Dumbo” was made in 1941. Not exactly the best time for race relations in America. But, for argument’s sake, let’s say that the filmmakers weren’t playing on stereotypes, or making a racial statement.

But let’s take a trip to the Internet Movie Database to look at the characters, specifically, the leader of the crows:

Cliff Edwards
Jim Crow (voice) (uncredited)

Oh, Jim Crow? Now where have I heard that before?

Jim Crow was the name of the racial caste system which operated primarily, but not exclusively in southern and border states, between 1877 and the mid-1960s. Jim Crow was more than a series of rigid anti-black laws. It was a way of life. Under Jim Crow, African Americans were relegated to the status of second class citizens. Jim Crow represented the legitimization of anti-black racism.

That’s pretty racist. Let’s try again.

At least Disney gave black actors a chance to make money in their craft at a time when discrimination was basically the law of the land and film opportunities were hard to come by, right? Let’s look at the voice of “Dumbo’s” Jim Crow, Cliff Edwards:

I give up.

Songs for Hookerpiss’s America

The reason this comes to mind goes back to the day before the inauguration, the day of the redneck Woodstock at the Lincoln Memorial for the new president.

One woman of color had the opportunity to perform for the Hairclub for Men’s poster boy:

Singer Rebecca Ferguson has said she would accept an invitation to perform at Donald Trump’s inauguration on 20 January on one condition: she be allowed to sing Strange Fruit.

That’s this song, which was made famous by Billie Holliday:

The Trump people said no, because who wants to hear a song about stringing black folks up from trees, so Ferguson backed out.

But good-ol’-boy Toby Keith did perform and highlighted this little ditty:

Did you catch that?

Grandpappy told my pappy: Back in my day, son,
A man had to answer for the wicked that he done
Take all the rope in Texas, find a tall oak tree
Round up all of them bad boys,
hang them high in the street
For all the people to see.

So let’s parse this. When a white guy sings an ode to lynching, it’s free speech and America first. But when a black woman says she wants to sing a song against lynching, it’s offensive to a pussy grabber?