Babyman is going to screw this up, too

Actually, I’m sure he’s responsible for this getting out of control.

The horrific scale of death and destruction is coming into focus, even as the wildfires continue to rage throughout Northern California.

Thirty-one confirmed dead, many of them elderly.

Hundreds still missing on Friday.

Thousands of homes and businesses destroyed, including whole neighborhoods reduced to smoldering rubble.

“We all have suffered a trauma here, and we’re going to be a long time in recovering from this incident,” Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Coursey told reporters.

As authorities continue assessing the damage from the most devastating spate of wildfires to strike the state in modern history, the blazes are burning mostly uncontained — with winds likely to return this weekend, breathing dangerous new life into the deadly arc of flames.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection officials said Thursday that some 190,000 acres had been scorched across the state — a collective area nearly the size of New York City — as dangerous conditions spread the fires with frightening speed.

Massive wildfires, one major hurricane after another, record temperatures that keep rising every year.

And the GOP still says climate change doesn’t exist. You think maybe the crimson menace should be dealing with this instead of sending his vice presidential toady to walk out of football games?

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It gets worse every day, especially when you see his priorities

This from North Korea (via Gizmodo)

North Korea’s foreign minister Ri Yong Ho just had a rare press conference outside the United Nations in New York. And it’s not great. The diplomat declared that the US has declared war on North Korea. And he stressed that he hopes the world remembers in the future that it was the US who declared war first.

“As you already know, for the last few days, the United Nations sincerely wished that the war of words between the DPRK and the United States did not turn into real actions,” he began, according to his translator.
“However, last weekend Trump claimed that our leadership wouldn’t be around much longer. And hence, at last, he declared a war on our country,” Ri continued.

President Trump declared in a speech at the UN last week that the US stands ready to “totally destroy” the country if necessary, in response to North Korea’s persistent nuclear weapons tests and overt threats to US territory Guam. His tweets about leader Kim Jong-un, who he calls “Rocket Man,” have also worsened tensions between the US and North Korea.

“Given the fact that this comes from someone who is currently holding the seat of the United States presidency, this is clearly a declaration of war,” Ri said at today’s press conference.
“All the member states participating in the United nations and the whole world should clearly remember that it was the US who first declared war on our country. The UN charter stipulates individual member states’ rights to self defense,” said Ri.

So, given that we’re on the brink of nuclear war, what did the kopper koiffed kleptocrat talk about today?

President Trump defended his high-profile campaign against NFL players who kneel during the national anthem and insisted it hasn’t distracted him from hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

“To me, the NFL situation is a very important situation,” Trump said Tuesday at a news conference. “I have plenty of time on my hands. All I do is work.”

Oh, yeah, what has he done on Puerto Rico?

President Trump’s slow, unenthusiastic and — yes — mean response to the humanitarian crisis facing Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria is astonishing. He seems oblivious to the fact that the 3.4 million people living there are Americans, in many cases more patriotic than he is.

First, let’s talk about Trump’s delayed response to the disaster. While Trump visited Texas twice within a week shortly after Hurricane hit that state, and traveled to Florida five days after Hurricane Irma, he made no immediate plans to visit Puerto Rico.

Facing a barrage of criticism in the media and tweets from — among others — former Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton for ignoring the natural disaster in Puerto Rico, the White House announced Tuesday that Trump would visit the island on Oct. 3. It will be almost two weeks after the storm.

And what the fuck does “I have plenty of time on my hands. All I do is work” even mean?

May the people who put this klown in office suffer a thousand times more than the people in Puerto Rico, who are better Americans than the pump truppets will ever be.

One of these things is not like the other

From the mind of the kooky klan kuddler:

“I think now, with what’s happened with the hurricane, I’m gonna ask for a speed up,” he said. “I wanted a speed up anyway, but now we need it even more so. So we need to simplify the tax code, reduce taxes very substantially on the middle class, and make our business tax more globally competitive. We’re the highest anywhere in the world right now.”

What does a hurricane have to do with tax revision? I don’t understand the logic. Give rich people tax cuts so you don’t have to pay for disaster cleanup? This makes no sense.

(Thanks, Mock, Paper, Scissors)

 

Harvey was bad. Irma is worse.

This is what Hurricane Irma looked like on Saturday night (click to enlarge):

It’s going to hit the Florida Keys any minute now. Then, it’s on a  path to hit Tampa.

The Washington Post wrote this about the Tampa area in July, long before the threat was even possible:

Yet the bay area — greater Tampa, St. Petersburg and Clearwater — has barely begun to assess the rate of sea-level rise and address its effects. Its slow response to a major threat is a case study in how American cities reluctantly prepare for the worst, even though signs of impacts from climate change abound all around.

State leaders could be part of the reason. Republican Gov. Rick Scott’s administration has reportedly discouraged employees from using the words “climate change” in official communications. Last month, the Republican-controlled state legislature approved bills allowing any citizen to challenge textbooks and instructional materials, including those that teach the science of evolution and global warming.

The sea in Tampa Bay has risen naturally throughout time, about an inch per decade. But in the early 1990s, scientists say, it accelerated to several inches above normal, so much that recent projections have the bay rising between six inches and more than two feet by the middle of the century and up to nearly seven feet when it ends. On top of that, natural settling is causing land to slowly sink.

Sea-level rise worsens the severity of even small storms, adding to the water that can be pushed ashore. Hard rains now regularly flood neighborhoods in St. Petersburg, Tampa and Clearwater.

Now’s a good time to go to the Post and read: Tampa Bay’s coming storm.

Track the storm here:

And here’s a CNN live stream: