A killer hurricane is bearing down on the Southeast …

… So what are the respected voices of the right wing saying about the impending natural disaster that’s already killed almost 300 people in Haiti?

According to the Rude Pundit:

Drudge has said that the National Hurricane Center is hyping Matthew and lying about wind speed because they want to “make exaggerated point on climate” change.

And what is the Rushbot saying?

But if you listened to conservative talk radio, you might have heard Rush Limbaugh himself today on Oxy the Obese Clown’s Analotorium of Fart Noises telling you that Matthew is being hyped because Al Gore needs to prove that climate change is real. No, really: “After Katrina, remember, Al Gore and all the global warming people? They were happy! They were beating their chests like Tarzan out there, and they were saying, ‘This is just the beginning! Because of climate change and because of global warming, we’re gonna have hurricanes like this every year, many of them.'”

I’m glad someone reads and listens to these alt-right clowns so I don’t have to.

The folks that right wingers listen to are more than willing to lead their lemmings to suicide to make a point. And the cliff jumpers on the right will listen to them, because they think it’s clever to say and do things that piss off liberals. (Like nominate a certain anthropromorphic pile of cow manure for president.) So expect a bunch of make America firsters who believe this mush from the manure pile …


… to stay in their homes and ride out this storm.

hurricane-matthew-oct-4And remember the parable of the flood:

A terrible storm came into a town and local officials sent out an emergency warning that the riverbanks would soon overflow and flood the nearby homes. They ordered everyone in the town to evacuate immediately.

A faithful Christian man heard the warning and decided to stay, saying to himself, “I will trust God and if I am in danger, then God will send a divine miracle to save me.”

The neighbors came by his house and said to him, “We’re leaving and there is room for you in our car, please come with us!” But the man declined. “I have faith that God will save me.”

As the man stood on his porch watching the water rise up the steps, a man in a canoe paddled by and called to him, “Hurry and come into my canoe, the waters are rising quickly!” But the man again said, “No thanks, God will save me.”

The floodwaters rose higher pouring water into his living room and the man had to retreat to the second floor. A police motorboat came by and saw him at the window. “We will come up and rescue you!” they shouted. But the man refused, waving them off saying, “Use your time to save someone else! I have faith that God will save me!”

The flood waters rose higher and higher and the man had to climb up to his rooftop.

A helicopter spotted him and dropped a rope ladder. A rescue officer came down the ladder and pleaded with the man, “Grab my hand and I will pull you up!” But the man STILL refused, folding his arms tightly to his body. “No thank you! God will save me!”

Shortly after, the house broke up and the floodwaters swept the man away and he drowned.

When in Heaven, the man stood before God and asked, “I put all of my faith in You. Why didn’t You come and save me?”

And God said, “I sent you a warning. I sent you a car. I sent you a canoe. I sent you a motorboat. I sent you a helicopter. What more were you looking for?”

Now, I could be compassionate, pull out my Bible and refer the followers of manure, Drudge and Rush to Matthew 7:15:

Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.

But acquiescent morons really piss me off, so I’m giving the final word to the Rude Pundit:

Jesus fuck, fine, just fucking stay there, Drudge readers and Limbaugh listeners. Fucking stay and drown and get your asses reamed by flying debris with your corpses devoured by alligators. You’ll end up improving the nation considerably in your absence.

A reflection on ‘Do the Right Thing’


And speaking of the opening credits:

So why are we thinking about “Do the Right Thing“?

Because Radio Raheem died this week.

Bill Nunn, a versatile actor best known for playing the role of Radio Raheem, the boombox-toting neighborhood philosopher killed by police officers in Spike Lee’s 1989 film “Do the Right Thing,” died on Saturday in Pittsburgh. He was 63.

His death was announced on social media by Mr. Lee. His wife, Donna, told The Associated Press that Mr. Nunn had cancer.


Bill Nunn

What I didn’t realize was that we’ve seen Bill Nunn in a lot of things. He was in the Spider-Man movies, appeared in “Sister Act” and was a regular character actor on television.

Also, here’s something interesting to consider. Radio Raheem’s death by cop in “Do the Right Thing” happened decades ago. Very little has changed, but there has been an interesting reaction to similar circumstances today:

colin-kaepernick-time-maagzine-cover-leadAnd this is why Colin Kaepernick is taking a knee during the playing of the national anthem. Because brutality that was the climax of a movie in 1989 that had pundits like Joe Klein saying that the movie was dangerous because it would make blacks want to riot (that’s right Joe, I haven’t forgotten that piece of editorial diarrhea) still happens today and doesn’t appear like it’s going to stop anytime soon.

Spike Lee was criticized for making it the focus of attention in 1989. Colin Kaepernick is criticized for making it the focus of attention in 2016.

Mel Brooks on Gene Wilder

Honest to God, I didn’t know Anne Bancroft had died!

But let’s look at “Springtime for Hitler,” from “The Producers,” the most tasteless (and funniest) musical number of all time.

And since Mel talked about “Young Frankenstein,” let’s look at some outtakes:

What the hell!?!? Madeline Kahn is dead, too??!! Have I been living under a rock for the past 17 years?!?!?

And Gene Wilder died last week at 83.

(Oh, no! Marty Feldman died 33 years ago! I now consider myself oblivious to reality.)

Cinema’s first Lois Lane dies at 95

Noel Neill died. When you think of classic Superman, she was the actress who was consistent throughout television and movies, because she was the first Lois Lane and had some link to the franchise for at least 7 decades.


In 1948, she appeared in the “Superman” movie serial with Kirk Alyn. They did two serials. Then television came along and “Adventures of Superman” featured Phyllis Coates in its first season. She left the show, and the studio had Neill reprise her movie role for 78 episodes.

But that wasn’t the last we saw of Lois/Noel.

If you paid close attention to the first “Superman” movie with Christopher Reeve in 1978, you’ll notice a scene when a young Clark Kent races a train. A girl looks out of the train window. That’s a young Lois Lane. And the woman  with her playing her mother? That’s Noel Neill.

And in 2006’s “Superman Returns,” there’s a wealthy old woman who dies at the beginning and leaves her fortune to Lex Luthor. The actress was Noel Neill.

Of course, she appeared in numerous other television and movie roles. But she’s the Lois Lane of all Lois Lanes.

She died Sunday in Tucson.

Muhammad Ali dies at 74. He was the greatest of all time.

You’re going to see a lot of tributes in coming days to Muhammad Ali, who died in Arizona last night of respiratory problems. People are going to say the three-time world champion heavyweight boxer transcended sports and was a great humanitarian. They’re going to say how he was a powerful symbol for oppressed people. They’re going to say how good he looked and how watching him in action was witnessing the physical expression of poetry.

Which is all true.

But don’t let the tributes fool you. When Muhammad Ali was at the peak of his talents, he was one of the most hated people in America. Black people loved him. White people hated and feared him. Anyone who was alive in the ’60s and ’70s knows that was the case. He was hated because, unlike today’s athletes, he spoke out against injustice.

Remember civil rights? When people were saying we’ll all get along by just grabbing hands and singing “Kumbaya,” Ali was in America’s face talking about its hypocrisy:

In the previous video, they talked about Vietnam, the issue that resulted in the the theft of his heavyweight crown. But when smug college boys tried to tell him that he wasn’t patriotic and anti-American because he wouldn’t support his country’s war against a tiny nation thousands of miles away, he threw the issue back in their faces.

He really threw terror into the hearts of white America. Don’t think that everything was beautiful and the multitudes agreed with the things he said at the time he said them. He was lightyears away from today’s athletes in terms of skill in a sport, but most of all in terms of impact on society. Today’s athletes aren’t going to do anything that threatens the removal from their sport or the loss of multimillion dollar sponsorships they have with sneaker companies.

The greatness of Muhammad Ali is that he gave up everything for what he believed.

Really, when you think about it, there are only two great athletes who spoke on behalf of black America when blatant racism was just the routine of life. Muhammad Ali and Jackie Robinson.

Robinson was told to internalize the injustices he was subject to. Don’t fight back. Don’t say anything no matter what the bigots in the stands or on the fields said or did. So, in what was the right move for his time, Jackie took the abuse, but he also spoke up against it when the opportunity came.

Jackie Robinson died when he was 53. He died young, and I’ll always believe that the mistreatment he faced in his early years in baseball contributed to that.

One thing you can say for Muhammad Ali was that he didn’t internalize anything:

I’ve seen Muhammad Ali live twice and neither was in the ring. The first time was in 1979 at the No Nukes all-star concert at Madison Square Garden. He said a few words and tried to endorse a senate candidate, but the crowd was surly and shouted “No politics.” Which was kind of stupid because:

  1. The anti-nuclear movement has to be a political movement. I mean how else are you going to put an end to nuclear power and nuclear weapons unless you get politicians to pass laws against them? And …
  2. When you’re giving a concert in New York’s Madison Square Garden, you’re using a lot of kilowatts. Where do you think that energy is coming from other than the nuclear plant up the river.

Anyway, Ali left the stage and the bands played on before an oblivious crowd.

The second time I saw him was at the 2013 Louisville vs. Florida Sugar Bowl college football game in New Orleans.

It made me so sad. Look at that beautiful vibrant intelligent man of the 1960s, and then to see him 50 years later wasting away is heartbreaking.

But we shouldn’t feel sad, because we’ve witnessed one of the most important people of the 20th century.

He was the greatest of all time.