Here’s what the NRA terrorist group paid for those thoughts and prayers

From Mock, Paper Scissors

Here’s what the NRA paid for all those thoughts and prayers:


  • Marco Rubio (R-FL) – $9,900
  • Mitch McConnell (R-KY) – $9,900
  • Rob Portman (R-OH) – $9,900
  • Joni Ernst (R-IA) – $9,900
  • Thom Tillis (R-NC) – $9,900
  • Dean Heller (R-NV) – $9,900
  • Jim Inhofe (R-OK) – $9,450
  • John Hoeven (R-ND) – $8,450
  • Steve Daines (R-MT) – $7,700
  • Ron Johnson (R-WI) – $7,450
  • John Boozman (R-AR) – $5,950
  • Todd Young (R-IN) – $5,950
  • Mike Rounds (R-SD) – $5,450
  • James Lankford (R-OK) – $5,000
  • Bill Cassidy (R-LA) – $4,950
  • Richard Shelby (R-AL) – $4,950
  • David Perdue (R-GA) – $4,950
  • Tim Scott (R-SC) – $4,500
  • Shelly Moore Capito (R-WV) – $2,500
  • Ted Cruz (R-TX) – $350
  • John McCain (R-AZ) – $300


  • Barbara Comstock (R-VA) – $10,400
  • Mike Coffman (R-CO) – $9,900
  • Will Hurt (R-TX) – $9,900
  • John Katko (R-NY) – $9,900
  • Bruce Poliquin (R-ME) -$9,900
  • Lee Zeldin (R-NY) – $9,900
  • Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) – $7,450
  • Martha McSally (R-AZ) – $6,500
  • Bill Schuster (R-PA) – $5,950
  • Richard Hudson (R-NC) – $4,950
  • Steve Scalise (R-LA) – $4,950
  • Lamar Smith (R-TX) – $4,950
  • Ken Calvert (R-CA) – $4,500
  • Barry Loudermilk (R-GA) – $4,000
  • Robert Aderholt (R-AL) – $3,500
  • Michael McCaul (R-TX) – $3,500
  • Darin LaHood (R-IL) – $3,000
  • Erik Paulson (R-MN) – $3,000
  • Tom Reed (R-NY) – $3,000
  • Diane Black (R-TN) – $2,500
  • Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) – $2,500
  • Carlos Curbelo (R-FL) – $2,500
  • Rodney Davis (R-IL) $2,500
  • John Ratcliff (R-TX) – $2,500
  • Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) – $2,500
  • Pete Sessions (R-TX) – $2,500
  • Roger Williams (R-TX) – $2,500
  • Mike Bishop (R-MI) – $2,000
  • Bradley Byrne (R-AL) – $2,000
  • Buddy Carter (R-GA) – $2,000
  • Chris Collins (R-NY) – $2,000
  • Mario Diaz Balart (R-FL) – $2,000
  • Sean Duffy (R-WI) – $2,000
  • Chuck Fleischmann (R-TN) – $2,000
  • Tim Walz (D-MN) – $2,000
  • Bob Gibbs (R-OH) – $2,000
  • Paul Gossar (R-AZ) – $2,000
  • Sam Graves (R-MO) – $2,000
  • Glenn Grothman (R-WI) $2,000
  • Vicky Hartzler (R-MO) – $2,000
  • Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) – $2,000
  • French Hill (R-AR) – $2,000
  • Bill Huizenga (R-MI) – $2,000
  • Darrell Issa (R-CA) – $2,000
  • Bill Johnson (R-OH) – $2,000
  • Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) – $2,000
  • Doug Lamborn (R-CO) – $2,000
  • Luke Messer (R-IN) – $2,000
  • Kristi Noem (R-SD) – $2,000
  • Scott Perry (R-PA) – $2,000
  • Robert Pittenger (R-NC) – $2,000
  • Ted Poe (R-TX) – $2,000
  • Tom Rice (R-SC) – $2,000
  • Martha Roby (R-AL) – $2,000
  • Mike Rogers (R-AL) – $2,000
  • Todd Rokita (R-IN) – $2,000
  • Peter Roskam (R-IL) – $2,000
  • Dennis Ross (R-FL) – $2,000
  • Austin Scott (R-GA) – $2,000
  • Jason Smith (R-MO) – $2,000
  • Elise Stefanik (R-NY) – $2,000
  • Steve Stivers (R-OH) – $2,000
  • Mark Walker (R-NC) – $2,000
  • Jackie Walorski (R-IN) – $2,000
  • Mimi Walters (R-CA) – $2,000
  • Joe Wilson (R-SC) – $2,000
  • Rob Wittman (R-VA) – $2,000
  • Steven Palazzo (R-MS) – $1,750
  • Mike Kelly (R-PA) – $1,500
  • Steve Womack (R-AR) – $1,500
  • Ralph Abraham (R-LA) – $1,000
  • Lou Barlettea (R-PA) – $1,000
  • Susan Brooks (R-IN) – $1,000
  • Warren Davidson (R-OH) – $1,000
  • Ron DeSantis (R-FL) – $1,000
  • Louie Gohmert (R-TX) – $1,000
  • Kenny Marchant (R-TX) – $1,000
  • Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) – $1,000
  • David McKinley (R-WV) – $1,000
  • Dave Reichert (R-WA) – $1,000
  • Tom Rooney (R-FL) – $1,000
  • Randy Weber (R-TX) – $1,000
  • Daniel Webster (R-FL) – $1,000

Beetle Bailey still hasn’t been to war

And now his creator is dead:

Mort Walker, whose “Beetle Bailey” comic strip followed the exploits of a lazy G.I. and his inept cohorts at the dysfunctional Camp Swampy, and whose dedication to his art form led him to found the first museum devoted to the history of cartooning, died Jan. 27 at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 94.

Bill Morrison, president of the National Cartoonists Society, confirmed the death. The cause was pneumonia.

In contrast with the work-shirking soldier he immortalized, Mr. Walker was a man of considerable drive and ambition. He drew his daily comic strip for 68 years, longer than any other U.S. artist in the history of the medium. …

Beetle’s cast includes the title character, a lanky goof-off whose eyes are always covered by the visor of his hat or helmet; his rotund nemesis, Sgt. Snorkel, a violent but sentimental man who frequently beat Beetle to a pulp of squiggly lines; the ineffectual Gen. Halftrack, who ran Camp Swampy (a place the Pentagon had lost track of); Halftrack’s voluptuous secretary, Miss Buxley; Cookie, the hairy-shouldered chef and purveyor of inedible meatballs; and the bumpkin Pvt. Zero.

The characters never saw battle, and weapons and uniforms were not updated. Mr. Walker said that the military setting was simply a convenient stand-in for the pecking order of which everyone is a part.

Gomer Pyle died

I don’t know why this came as a surprise:

Jim Nabors, a singer and comic actor who played the bumbling but good-natured hayseed Gomer Pyle on “The Andy Griffith Show” before starring as an unlikely Marine recruit in “Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.,” one of the most popular sitcoms of the 1960s, died Nov. 30 at his home in Hono­lulu. He was 87.

His death was confirmed to the Associated Press by his husband, Stan Cadwallader. The cause was not disclosed, but Mr. Nabors had a liver transplant in 1994 and heart surgery in 2012.

Mr. Nabors had never acted before Griffith saw him perform at a nightclub, where he portrayed a bumpkin whose high-pitched drawl changed to an operatic baritone when he broke into song.

Yes, he was old. That means I’m old since it didn’t cross my mind that he was old.

This was the essence of Gomer:

The NRA almost caused another Newtown

When I was going up, our elementary school disaster drill was to quickly get away from windows and cower in hallways, because the Cubans had nuclear weapons supplied by Russia, and we thought they were going to use them on us. As a second grader, I didn’t know that at the time. I figured it out years later.

But second graders today know that when they have an emergency drill, it’s because a psychopath with a gun is in the area, and they don’t want to be victims of another Sandy Hook. Because things like this are happening:

Parents were dropping their children off at Rancho Tehama Elementary School, a tiny building in a rural stretch of Northern California, when they heard the first shot. Almost immediately, two more gunshots cracked through the morning air.

It was just minutes before school was supposed to begin on Tuesday morning. The school secretary made a snap decision: Lock down the school. She and other staff members ushered children from the quad into the school, quickly urging nearly 100 young students inside, along with four teachers, aides and parents, said Rick Fitzpatrick, superintendent of the Corning Union Elementary school District.

Children were still hurrying in when the gunman’s white pickup truck came tearing down the street and crashed into the school’s locked gate. A man later identified as Kevin J. Neal jumped out, wielding a semi-automatic rifle and wearing a vest packing additional ammunition, authorities said. Children were still hurrying into classrooms, Fitzpatrick said, when the head custodian looked around a corner.

Neal raised his rifle, targeting the custodian, but it apparently jammed, Fitzpatrick said. By the time Neal cleared the jam, the last student was inside and the school was locked down.

Within 10 seconds of the lockdown going into place, Neal was standing in the quad where, moments earlier, children had been playing.

Children, school staff and parents huddled inside under desks and in offices. Outside, Neal raised his rifle and began to fire. Police said in the hours leading up to that moment, he had killed his wife and hidden her body before beginning a bloody rampage across this community about 135 miles north of Sacramento.

Neal, who also tried to open doors and get inside, fired at the school for six agonizing minutes, shattering windows and shooting through wooden walls, authorities said. One bullet struck a child, while others were wounded with broken glass. Neal eventually “became frustrated” and gave up, abandoning the school, Phil Johnston, an assistant sheriff in Tehama County, told reporters.

The NRA says everyone should have a gun. Even this guy, Kevin J. Neil:

The NRA has bought and paid for the Republican Congress and has killed more Americans than all the Islamist terrorist groups combined. This psychopath intended to go into a school and blow away as many children as he could. But we’re now trained to go into lockdown mode for a mass shooter because members of the GOP won’t do anything to offend their masters in the NRA.

Domestic violence and mass murder

Samantha Bee pointed this out on Nov. 1:

This gun atrocity happened on Nov. 5:

Authorities in the US state of Texas say the suspect in Sunday’s deadly shooting at a church was dealing with a “domestic situation” at the time of the attack.

The suspect, whose identity authorities confirmed as Devin Patrick Kelley, sent threatening text messages to his mother-in-law, who sometimes attended the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, where the shooting took place.

“We know that he expressed anger towards his mother-in-law, who attends this church,” said Freeman Martin, of the Texas Department of Public Safety, in a press conference on Monday.

“There was a domestic situation going on within this family,” said Martin.

That report was in Al Jazeera. The world is watching us and saying, “What the hell is wrong with you Americans?!”

The NRA adds Christians to its list of murder victims

Because this happened today:

A gunman shot and killed more than two dozen people and injured many others Sunday inside a small community church here in South Texas, and he was found dead several miles away from the scene after fleeing, authorities said.

The mass shooting happened during morning services at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, a small town in the countryside more than 30 miles southeast of San Antonio, and it claimed the lives of people ranging in age from 5 to 72, authorities said.

Witnesses described the shooter as a man in his 20s wearing all black clothing and a tactical vest.

Here’s a story from 2015:

Using numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we found that from 2001 to 2013, 406,496 people died by firearms on U.S. soil. (2013 is the most recent year CDC data for deaths by firearms is available.) This data covered all manners of death, including homicide, accident and suicide.
According to the U.S. State Department, the number of U.S. citizens killed overseas as a result of incidents of terrorism from 2001 to 2013 was 350.
In addition, we compiled all terrorism incidents inside the U.S. and found that between 2001 and 2013, there were 3,030 people killed in domestic acts of terrorism.* This brings the total to 3,380.
Those are numbers from 2013. We are in 2017 and we’ve lost count of the number of Americans killed by guns since then. But let’s be clear on this. The NRA has murdered more than 100 times as many Americans as al-Qaeda and ISIS and MS-13 and every other boogeyman the Republicans have thrown at the pump truppets and their enablers since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States.
The NRA is a terrorist organization, and a pretty damn efficient one at that. Because it’s fluffers in the GOP aren’t going to do anything to put an end to its reign of carnage. All they’re going to do is this:
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said in a statement that his office stands ready to assist local law enforcement as needed: “The thoughts and prayers of all Texans are with the people of Sutherland Springs as tragic reports come out of First Baptist Church.” 
More thoughts and prayers while the deadly reign of the NRA continues. That’s all Republicans ever offer.

60 years ago in space

Laika, Russian cosmonaut dog, 1957. Laika was the first animal to orbit the Earth, travelling on board the Sputnik 2 spacraft launched on Nov. 3, 1957. The Soviet space program used dogs and other animals to ascertain the viability of later space travel. (Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

From the New Yorker;

On the evening of November 3, 1957, barely a month after the Soviet Union sent humanity’s first artificial satellite into orbit, a rocket lifted off from a secret site in Kazakhstan, carrying its second. The launch of Sputnik 2 was timed to coincide with the fortieth anniversary of the October Revolution, and the craft itself was an appropriately showy statement of Communist know-how—six times heavier than Sputnik 1, designed to fly nearly twice as high, and, most impressive of all, containing a live passenger. A week before the mission began, Moscow Radio had broadcast an interview with the cosmonaut in question, described as “a small, shaggy dog.” Western newspapers, however, were initially confused about what to call her. Introduced as Kudryavka (“Little Curly”), she was also known as Limonchik (“Little Lemon”) and Damka (“Little Lady”). A Soviet spokesman eventually clarified that her name was Laika (“Barker”), which did nothing to stop a columnist at Newsday from referring to her exclusively as “Muttnik.”

It kind of went like this:

Well, not really;

But the story of Laika had a dark lie at its core. In 2002, forty-five years after the fact, Russian scientists revealed that she had died, probably in agony, after only a few hours in orbit. In the rush to put another satellite into space, the Soviet engineers had not had time to test Sputnik 2’s cooling system properly; the capsule had overheated. It remained in orbit for five months with Laika inside, then plunged into the atmosphere and burned up over the Caribbean, a space coffin turned shooting star. Turkina quotes one of the scientists assigned to Laika’s program: “The more time passes, the more I’m sorry about it. We shouldn’t have done it. We did not learn enough from the mission to justify the death of the dog.”

And this final word from Laika’s trainer:

Laika’s trainer, Adilya Kotovskaya, a Russian biologist, recently told Agence France-Presse of her remorse as she prepared to send Laika into space: “I asked her to forgive us and I even cried as I stroked her for the last time.”