The Orange Menace: Redacted

So, El Cheeto gave an interview with Time magazine recently, and the folks at The Slot took a look at it and redacted everything that wasn’t true:

Here’s what they ended up with:

But even with that extreme vetting of the Lügenorange’s words, the folks at The Slot came to a realization:

Correction: We actually missed another false statement. Trump received 306 electoral college votes on election day, but thanks to two “faithless” electors, his official tally is 304; his claims that he “ended up at 306” and “ended up getting to 306″ are technically false. 

I get two important points out of this:

  1. Time magazine did the American public a disservice by printing this interview verbatim without providing a fact check at the end of the article.
  2. You can tell the stub fingered babyman is lying when you see him moving his lips. But you already knew that.

Republican honor: TBD

And why is this not funny? The Guardian explains:

[W]e can’t just point the finger at, and pray for the downfall of, Donald Trump. He is merely the face of a deeper Republican malaise. The hypocrisies he embodies extend far beyond him. For decades, Republicans cast themselves as the party of family values, wagging their finger at anyone who had fallen short of the moral standards they set. But when Trump came along, promising them the tax cuts and seats on the supreme court they craved, all that went out of the window. Suddenly they were prepared to embrace a thrice-married worshipper of mammon who brags about sexually assaulting women and was happy to assess his own daughter as “a piece of ass”. Note the polling on white evangelical Christians. In 2011 they were the group least likely to accept that a candidate guilty of immoral behaviour in their personal life might nevertheless be able to act ethically as a leader. Now they are the by 2017 to become the most forgiving on that score.
Consider the way Republicans used to claim “freedom” as their own, posing as liberty’s champions. Now it emerges that fewer than half of all Republican voters believe news organisations should be free to criticise political leaders – a freedom that is surely fundamental.
And of course, for decades Republicans wrapped themselves in the flag, claiming a monopoly on patriotism, casting themselves as the heirs to Ronald Reagan and all those who stood strong against Russian authoritarianism. Yet now, delegates to the CPAC ultra-conservative conference will happily wave little Russian flags, so long as they have Trump’s name on them.
It’s natural to direct our fury at Trump and to want to see him gone. But it was the wider American right that, over more than two decades, feasted on bigotry, ignorance and contempt for science, facts and the compromises required by democratic governance – it was that right that incubated Trump and Trumpism. If impeachment and removal from office are ever to be more than a fantasy, it will be Republicans who will have to make it happen. And that will require them to do more than change a president. They will have to change themselves.

Town hall troubles: the GOP strategy

02-26-mcfadden

Remember when Obama was president and the Tea Party “patriots” disrupted town hall meetings held by Democrats, which the Democrats didn’t run away from? Of course you don’t. Americans don’t remember anything. But that did happen, and Democrats lost in the midterms because they put up with the abuse that was based on right wing fantasy.

Now, we’re dealing with reality, and the GOP is running scared. So Republican strategy is to not meet with voters in their states and districts. They need to be severely punished in the midterms. If they’re not, it will show that the best way to deal with your constituents is to ignore them.

How are they going to be remembered?

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I know Immigrations and Customs Enforcement has a difficult job, and for the most part is made up of good people, but at some point, someone in the agency will have to think seriously about how he or she as an individual wants to be remembered.

Because they have to stop doing shit like this:

Muhammad Ali Jr. had just returned to Florida from Jamaica, where he had accompanied his mother, Khalilah Camacho-Ali, who was there giving a speech about black history. After arriving at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood airport, Ali Jr. — son of one of the greatest boxers of all time — was detained and asked at least twice about his religion, according to family friend and attorney Chris Mancini. Ali — born in Philadelphia in 1972 — and his mother are both Muslim.

“To the Ali family, it’s crystal clear that this is directly linked to [President] Trump’s efforts to ban Muslims from the United States,” Mancini told the Courier-Journal (Louisville, Ky.) on Friday about the alleged incident, which occurred on Feb. 7.

About 75 years ago, this was tyranny:

Krakau, Razzia von deutscher Ordnungspolizei

Eighty years from now, when photos like the one below are viewed …

3d9a0fe600000578-4255362-an_illegal_immigrant_wanted_for_deportation_prompted_a_surprise_-a-3_1487921517120

… do ICE agents want their grandchildren and great-grandchildren to vilified them as if they were the German soldiers in the World War II photo?

This is what’s happening in the Oval Office

gkr542vThe Lügenduck tweets:

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Because he really understands the concept of classified information:

Korea launched a ballistic missile that traveled over 300 miles before crashing into the Sea of Japan—far enough to hint at the ability to drop a nuke on one of the US’ closest allies.

Naturally, President Trump discussed the matter with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who was visiting the US, and National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. But here’s the problem: He did so in full view of guests at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, with smartphone cameras and flashlights pointed at presumably sensitive material.

On Monday, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said that “no classified material” was shared at dinner, and that the president had received an intelligence briefing beforehand in an on-site Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility, a specially outfitted room with one purpose: Keep out the spies.

Whatever comfort that reassurance affords, it doesn’t change the reality that a high-level diplomatic conversation took place that night in full view of waitstaff and nearby diners—at least one of whom posted about the show on social media.

“It was fascinating to watch the flurry of activity at dinner when the news came that North Korea had launched a missile in the direction of Japan,” wrote Richard DeAgazio in his now-private Facebook caption. A briefing may have happened in the SCIF, but plenty of discussion happened outside of it, too. The documents in Trump’s hands may not have been classified, but Flynn and White House adviser Stephen Bannon deemed them important enough to huddle over.

If the bulk of the president’s security discussions took place in a SCIF, great. If even a small portion of them didn’t, Trump and his team took an inexcusable risk with national security.